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    Scripophily.com CNBC Video Interview

    This is when Bill Griffith of CNBC coined the word "Scripophiliac"


    Bob Kerstein with Jane Wells - CNBC Interview
     


    Scripophily.com CNBC Video Interview

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    Scripophily Press Releases

    • Scripophily.com Launches Websites to Purchase Paper United States Government Treasury Bonds, Bearer Bonds and Savings Bonds

      November 18, 2013 -- United States Government no longer issue paper bond certificates which can make them more valuable as a collectible vs. redeeming them with the United States Treasury.

      Scripophily.com Launches Websites to Purchase Paper United States Government Treasury Bonds, Bearer Bonds and Savings Bonds

      Disney is one of Many Companies no Longer Issuing Stock Certificates Still Being Offered as a Collectible by Scripophily.com.

      October 21, 2013 -- Delaware law, stock exchange rules and company cost cutting add to the collector supply shortage. Historical significance, artwork and scarcity of stock and bond certificates make them unique and popular gifts for the holiday season.

      Disney is one of Many Companies no Longer Issuing Stock Certificates Still Being Offered as a Collectible by Scripophily.com.

      Original Lehman Brothers Holdings, Inc Stock Certificates Are Now Being Offered by Scripophily.Com

      September 20, 2013 -- These scarce certificates are in high demand by collectors due to Lehman Brothers' historical significance during the Great Recession.

      Original Lehman Brothers Holdings, Inc Stock Certificates Are Now Being Offered by Scripophily.Com

      Scripophily.com Offers an Authentic Fifty Trillion Dollar Banknote for All Purchases over $200

      September 18, 2013 -- In 2009, the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe introduced a new family of trillion Zim-dollar banknotes that went into circulation. Scripophily.com has a limited supply of these notes that are being offered to customers.

      Scripophily.com Offers an Authentic Fifty Trillion Dollar Banknote for All Purchases over $200

      Scripophily.com Celebrates 133 Years of Continuous old Stock and Bond Research Services, Which Have Helped Tens of Thousands of Customers Since 1880

      September 16, 2013 -- The researching of old stock and bond certificates provides information in determining both redeemable worth as a financial security and collectible value in the hobby of Scripophily. Old Stock Certificates may have value and should be researched before they are thrown away.

      Scripophily.com Celebrates 133 Years of Continuous old Stock and Bond Research Services, Which Have Helped Tens of Thousands of Customers Since 1880

      Scripophily.com launches the sale of United States Savings Bonds on website

      August 20, 2013 -- United States Savings Bonds are becoming very collectible since the U.S. Treasury is no longer issuing them in paper form. Most bonds have been redeemed and destroyed.

      Scripophily.com launches the sale of United States Savings Bonds on website

      High Resolution Scans of Original Historical Stock and Bond Certificates are Now Available from Scripophily.com

      July 24, 2013 -- Scripophily.com's images have been used in Movies, TV Shows, News Programs, Books, Brochures and Publications, Museum's, Office Decorations, Websites, and other types of print and electronic forms of media.

      High Resolution Scans of Original Historical Stock and Bond Certificates are Now Available from Scripophily.com

      Scripophily.com offers original Standard Oil Trust Stock Certificate hand signed by signed by John. D. Rockefeller and Henry Flagler

      July 23, 2013 -- Standard Oil Trust was forced to dissolve due to violations of the Sherman Antitrust Act

      Scripophily.com offers original Standard Oil Trust Stock Certificate hand signed by signed by John. D. Rockefeller and Henry Flagler

      Dad’s and Grad’s Sale of Up to 50% off at Scripophily.com

      May 14, 2013 -- Stock and Bond certificate make unique and memorable gifts for everyone.

      Dad’s and Grad’s Sale of Up to 50% off at Scripophily.com

      Bull Market Gains Momentum in Collecting Old Paper Stock and Bond Certificates

      May 06, 2013 -- As Wall Street breaks records, more collectors want to Occupy Wall Space™ with mementos of Financial History from Scripophily.com.

      Bull Market Gains Momentum in Collecting Old Paper Stock and Bond Certificates

      Scripophily.com Completes Digitalization and Integration of Old Stock & Bond Research Archives Acquired from Herzog & Co., Inc.

      March 27, 2013 -- Acquisition and integration lifts OldCompany.com to the preeminent Old Company Stock and Bond Research Service in the World.

      Scripophily.com Completes Digitalization and Integration of Old Stock & Bond Research Archives Acquired from Herzog & Co., Inc.

      Scripophily.com offers Authentic Confederate States of America Bond Certificates issued during Civil War from 1861 to 1865

      March 05, 2013 -- Bonds were issued by the Confederate States of America to raise money to finance their huge war effort. Confederate States of America Bond Certificates are historically significant which make them an exciting piece of history to collect.

      Scripophily.com offers Authentic Confederate States of America Bond Certificates issued during Civil War from 1861 to 1865

      Scripophily Offers Trans - Antarctica Expedition Share Certificate; Founder of Scripophily.com Travels to Antarctica to Commemorate Early Explorers

      February 26, 2013 -- Scripophily Offers Trans - Antarctica Expedition Share Certificate with printed signature of famous Mt. Everest Climber Sir Edmund Hillary – 1958. Founder of Scripophily.com, Bob Kerstein, travels to Antarctica to commemorate early explorers

      Scripophily Offers Trans - Antarctica Expedition Share Certificate; Founder of Scripophily.com Travels to Antarctica to Commemorate Early Explorers

      Professional Scripophily Traders Association Announces Management Addition of Liberty Bond Expert to Board

      February 03, 2013 -- Lawrence D. Schuffman tapped as a special advisor to the Board of Directors of PSTA

      Professional Scripophily Traders Association Announces Management Addition of Liberty Bond Expert to Board

      Scripophily.com Offers 100 Year Old Grand Central Station $1000 Bond Certificate - Commemorates 100 Year Anniversary of Opening of Grand Central Station

      February 02, 2013 -- Scripophily.com is offering authentic cancelled 100 year $1000 bonds issued by the New York Central Railroad Company and the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company in 1913. Both of these bonds are engraved by the American Banknote Company and have a vignette (picture) of New York City's Grand Central Terminal in 1913.

      Scripophily.com Offers 100 Year Old Grand Central Station $1000 Bond Certificate - Commemorates 100 Year Anniversary of Opening of Grand Central Station

      Standard Oil Trust, Greek Debt and Confederate Bonds are Best Sellers at Scripophily.com - Stock and Bond Certificates Make Unique Gifts for the Holidays

      December 18, 2012 -- Best Seller Stock and Bond Certificates in 2012 include Standard Oil Trust Stock Certificates signed by John D. Rockefeller issued in 1882, Greek Debt Certificates issued in 1898 and Confederate States of America Bond Certificates issued by the Confederacy from 1861 to 1865.

      Standard Oil Trust, Greek Debt and Confederate Bonds are Best Sellers at Scripophily.com - Stock and Bond Certificates Make Unique Gifts for the Holidays

      Art and Scarcity of Old Stock and Bond Certificates Make Unique Gifts for the Holiday Season: Delaware Law and Stock Exchange Rules add to Collector Supply Shortage

      November 28, 2012 -- The supply of new stock and bond certificates reaching the collector market has been substantially reduced due to recent changes in State Laws and Stock Exchanges Rules. Many companies are no longer required to issue physical stock and bond certificates. Fees to issue paper stock certificates have increased dramatically.

      Art and Scarcity of Old Stock and Bond Certificates Make Unique Gifts for the Holiday Season: Delaware Law and Stock Exchange Rules add to Collector Supply Shortage

      Original War Bonds from around the World offered by Scripophily.com

      November 13, 2012 -- Scripophily.com ® is offering War Bonds from around the world covering the period from 1793 to 1945. These bonds include a United States Loan Office Colonial Bond, WWI and WWII bonds from the United States, Canada, Germany, China, Austria, France, Russia, and other countries. There are also a large selection of Confederate bonds from the United States Civil War.

      Original War Bonds from around the World offered by Scripophily.com

      Scripophily.com offering Free Shipping and a 2013 Historic Stock Certificate Calendar with all Orders, Plus a Free Fannie Mae Stock Certificate with all Orders over $200

      October 31, 2012 -- Scripophily.com ®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, is offering a Free Historic Stock Calendar with all orders and a Free Fannie Mae Stock Certificate with all orders over $200. Paper Stock and Bond Certificates and a Historic Stock Calendar Makes a Great Gifts for the Holidays.

      Scripophily.com offering Free Shipping and a 2013 Historic Stock Certificate Calendar with all Orders, Plus a Free Fannie Mae Stock Certificate with all Orders over $200

      2013 Historic Stock Certificate Calendar from Scripophily.com and Museum of American Finance

      October 09, 2012 -- 2013 Historic Wall Street Stock Certificate Calendar. Featuring colored images from Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Alaska Central Railway Company, Ferris Wheel at Columbian World’s Fair Exposition Chicago 1893, Republic of Ireland with Eamon de Valera as President Ireland, Confederate States of America Jefferson Davis $1,000 Bond Montgomery 1861, Ford Motor Car Company of Canada signed by Henry Ford Ontario, Canada 1908, Universal Aerial Navigation Co. Arizona 1911, Uncle Sam Mining and Milling Company Colorado 1899, Victor Talking Machine Company New Jersey 1927, World Wrestling Federation Entertainment, Inc., Charlotte Motor Speedway, Inc. Hand signed by NASCAR Legend, Curtis Turner - 1959, Gold Glen Mining Milling and Tunnelling Company Clear Creek, Colorado 1908, Walt Disney Productions hand signed by 12 of the Original Mouseketeers California 1974, and a Panama Canal Founders Share.

      2013 Historic Stock Certificate Calendar from Scripophily.com and Museum of American Finance

      Professional Scripophily Traders Association Announces Management Addition to Board

      August 30, 2012 -- The Professional Scripophily Traders Association (PSTA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Bryan Self to the Board of Directors as Vice President, Research. With the addition of this position, the PSTA continues to provide a leadership position for professionalism and scholastic integrity in the area of historical finance and hobby of Scripophily.

      Professional Scripophily Traders Association Announces Management Addition to Board

      Paper Stock and Bond Certificates Can Have Value as a Collectible or Redeemable Security, According to Old Company Stock Research Service

      May 30, 2012 -- If you have an old stock or bond certificate, and the company is no longer traded on an exchange, it could still have value as a collectible or redeemable security. To determine whether or not the certificate has any value, you can contact Scripophily.com - Old Company Research.

      Paper Stock and Bond Certificates Can Have Value as a Collectible or Redeemable Security, According to Old Company Stock Research Service

      Old Company Stock Research Business is Booming After Reuters reported Garage Sale Find of Possible $130 Million in Coke Stock

      May 07, 2012 -- Old Company Stock Research Service performed the research report to assist in establishing the facts in the case

      Old Company Stock Research Business is Booming After Reuters reported Garage Sale Find of Possible $130 Million in Coke Stock

      Scripophily.com Commemorates the 100th Anniversary of Titanic Sinking with Historical Documents for Sale

      April 09, 2012 -- Scripophily.com Commemorates the 100th Anniversary of Titanic Sinking with Historical Stock Certificates Scripophily.com / Old Company Research is offering historical documents for sale from companies associated with the RMS Titanic

      Scripophily.com Commemorates the 100th Anniversary of Titanic Sinking with Historical Documents for Sale

      Scripophily.com Announces Management Addition of Company Research Professional

      February 28, 2012 -- Scripophily.com / Old Company Research is pleased to announce the addition of Bryan Self to the staff as a Research Analyst to enhance the Old Company Research Investigative Department. Bryan Self comes to the Scripophily.com with years of business and investigation experience

       
    • Scripophily.com Acquires Old Stock & Bond Research Archives from Herzog & Co., Inc.

      January 26, 2012 -- Scripophily.com has acquired the Old Stock & Bond Research Archives from Herzog & Co., Inc. The asset purchase includes all archives and copyrights on obsolete research reference material published by the Marvyn Scudders Manuals, the Robert D. Fisher Manuals, and the Herzog & Co., Inc. obsolete research services, which have been performed continuously since 1880.

      Scripophily.com Acquires Old Stock & Bond Research Archives from Herzog & Co., Inc.

      Scripophily.com will Attend International Stock and Bond Show on January 27, 2012 in Herndon, Virginia

      January 11, 2012 -- Scripophily.com will attend International Stock and Bond Show on January 27, 2012 in Herndon, Virginia

       

      Scripophily.com - Old Stock Certificate Superstore Celebrates 16 years on the Internet

      December 29, 2011 -- Scripophily.com LLC is the internet’s leading buyer and seller of authentic stock and bond certificates, and is celebrating its 16th successful year on the Internet. The company is the Internet’s #1 Buyer and Seller of collectible stock and bond certificates and old company research services.

      Scripophily.com - Old Stock Certificate Superstore Celebrates 16 years on the Internet

      Greek Bonds are in Demand at Scripophily.com – Great Gift for the Holidays

      December 16, 2011 -- Old Stock and Bond Certificate make Terrific Gifts for the Holidays

      Greek Bonds are in Demand at Scripophily.com – Great Gift for the Holidays

      2012 Historic Wall Street Stock Certificate Calendar Makes a Great Gift for the Holidays

      December 06, 2011 -- Scripophily.com ® is offering a Historic Wall Street Stock Certificate Calendar with each month featuring a unique certificate in full color. This is a wonderful gift for customers, employees, friends, collectors, students and business historians. The actual size of the calendar is 8 1/2" x 11" (perfect size for mailing) with 28 color print pages including the cover. This year’s calendar includes selections from the Museum of American Finance, an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institute.

       

    • September 2009 - Journal of Accountancy - American Institute of Certified Public Accountants - Bob Kerstein, CPA
      Founder and CEO, Scripophily.com by Linda Segall


      Stock and bond certificates, to most people, represent a measure of financial investment in a company. The kinds of stocks and bonds I deal with represent insight into financial history. People like me who buy them are scripophilists, collectors of historical stock and bond certificates.

      I remember the day in 1990 when I caught the scripophily bug. I had moved to the Washington, D.C., area to head up the finance and technology functions of a satellite communications company....

      I love accounting; it got me started. And because of it, I have been able to pursue the things that not only come naturally to me, but are also my passion.
    • August 18, 2009 - Scripophily.com is now offering a Free General Motors Corp. Stock Certificate with all Orders Plus Free Ten Trillion Dollar Bill with all Orders over $200
    • August 10, 2009 SmartMoney.com — Investing, Saving and Personal Finance Consumer Action by Miriam Gottfried
      What Would You Pay for a Bear Stearns Teddy?
      After Benjamin Jordan and his colleagues at Lehman Brothers got word last year that the 158-year-old investment bank was insolvent, they watched as their office was progressively dismantled.....
      Bob.com Kerstein, founder of Scripophily, a site that sells old stock certificates, says some of his most valuable items are from iconic companies that burnt out brilliantly. Old Lehman Brothers certificates sold for $300 right away, he says. Some of the last certificates issued by General Motors are priced at $100 each on Kerstein’s site. (The shares those certificates represented were trading under $2 a piece during the months before the firm’s bankruptcy.)

      Real signatures on stock certificates can also lift their long-term upside, Kerstein says. He is asking for $395 for an 1897 Hoboken Ferry Company certificate bearing the signature of then-president Emanuel Lehman, one of the three brothers for which the brokerage was named. Now that Lehman is bankrupt, the certificate will be worth more to some collectors, Kerstein says....
       


      Antique News  WASHINGTON, DC (April 21, 2009)Scripophily.com offering Free Studebaker Packard and AIG Stock Certificates Scripophily.com ®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, is offering a Free Studebaker Packard Stock Certificate on all...

      Antique News - December 7, 2008 - 2009 Historic Stock Certificate Calendar from Scripophily.com is a Big Hit during Holiday Season Includes Lehman Brothers, Countrywide Mortgage, First U. S. Real Estate Bubble Disaster from 1795, Standard Oil Trust signed by John D. Rockefeller and many more

      2009 Historic Stock Certificate Calendar is a Big Hit during Holiday Season Includes Lehman Brothers, Countrywide Mortgage, First U. S. Real Estate Bubble Disaster from 1795, Standard Oil Trust signed by John D. Rockefeller and many more..

      Nov 20, 2008 Going out of stock David Chesanow Speaking of irresponsible financial corporations and Wall Street in general, I couldn’t help wondering what effect the current financial quagmire (you thought the term only referred to wars?) has had on the collecting field of scripophily: stock certificates, bonds and other financial paper. The guy I consult on all scripophilic matters is Bob Kerstein of Scripophily.com, in Falls Church, Va., the world’s largest dealer in collectible (and unredeemable) stock and bond certificates. Here are his responses to a few quick queries:
       
      AC: Who are your regular customers?

      Bob: Customers come from all walks of life. Mostly gifts this time of year. We have been receiving more foreign orders lately, but orders have slowed from bankers, due to the problems in the stock market.

      AC: What are the popular certificates and collecting areas?

      Bob: Popular certificates are the companies that are in the news, like Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns, Fannie Mae, Merrill Lynch, etc.

      AC: How would you advise someone to get started collecting stock certificates?

      Bob: Keep a focus on the types of companies in which you have a personal interest. Don’t buy for the sake of buying. The certificates that usually retain their value are the ones that are historically significant, good looking or are signed by someone famous.

      I checked Bob’s Web site: Get a pre-bankruptcy/delisting certificate for Lehman Brothers or Bear Stearns for $295, or a Fannie Mae (Federal National Mortgage) or Merrill Lynch certificate for $99.95. Or check out the hundreds and hundreds of vintage stocks and bonds, foreign as well as domestic. The color engraved illustrations on many are really beautiful, and they make great gifts – well worth the paper they’re printed on. See them at www.Scripophily.com.

      Images courtesy of Scripophily.com


      The Spectator, London - Wednesday, 22nd October 2008 -  Shares that go up as banks go down by  Scott Payton
      ‘Whenever there’s a catastrophe on Wall Street, our business just gets better — because our products become more collectable.’ So says Bob Kerstein, founder of Virginia-based Scripophily.com, the world’s largest buyer and seller of historic bonds and share certificates.

      The recent blizzard of insurance and investment banking failures has brought Kerstein particularly brisk business. ‘Our Merrill Lynch certificates are selling very well, and we’re almost completely out of Bear Sterns certificates,’ he says. ‘A few months ago you could buy a Merrill Lynch certificate for about $20 or $30. Now they’re worth upwards of $100.’

      The collectors’ market in early and historically significant bonds and share certificates first took off during the 1970s. By 1978, the hobby had become so popular that the Financial Times held a competition to come up with a name for it. The winning entry was ‘scripophily’ — ‘scrip’ is a term for a currency substitute, while ‘-ophily’ is a derivative of the Greek for ‘love’.....

      Miami Herald Fri, Sep. 19, 2008 Finding value in stock certificates ... A good starting point is the website of the federal Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) -- sec.gov/answers. It lists a number of publications you can consult to check the certificate's value, and also recommends Scripophily.com, a site that buys and sells them.


      Scripophily Article in the American Numismatic Association's "THE NUMISMATIST"
      for the month of September 2008."©2008 THE NUMISMATIST, official publication of the American Numismatic Association,
       www.money.org. Used with permission."


      We were sorry to hear that on March 11, 2008, it was reported that Spink based in London has acquired R.M. Smythe & Company, specialists in Antique Stocks and Bonds, Banknotes, Coins, and Autographs, based in New York City and established in 1880.


      March 24, 2008 - IDD Magazine (Investment Dealers' Digest)Paper Gains Would you pay $300 for an Enron bond? These folks will. By Aleksandrs Rozens

      When Enron went into bankruptcy, its stock and debt were viewed as pretty much worthless. Now, seven years after one of the most memorable corporate failures in history, a 9-1/2% bond from the defunct energy company has an offer price of nearly $300.

      Chances are the folks who will buy the bond issued in 1988 with Ken Lay's signature are not distressed debt investors but hobbyists who enjoy collecting paper bond and stock certificates, a pastime known as scripophily.

      For many, the bond and stock certificates' allure is the intersection of finance, history and art. Many of the companies are famous, either for their success or their spectacular failures. The certificates offer ornate artwork celebrating some aspect of a business. Pennsylvania Railroad certificates show off the railroad's Horse Shoe Curve, tracks running through Pennsylvania's mountains near Altoona. The New York Central illustrated its bonds and stocks with ornate illustration of its founder, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Grand Central Terminal.

      Many railroads issued debt to finance their race across the American continent, so their certificates illustrate fanciful scenes of the American West with Indians and covered wagons, as well as rough wilderness. On Oklahoma Oil Corp. stock signed by J. Paul Getty from the 1920s, you will find an ornamental border which incorporates scenes of oil derricks, oil tanks for storage and oil rail cars. Early Playboy Enterprises common stock features the profile of its trademark bunny and a nude of a woman.

      "People collect them for the artwork, the historical significance of the company, and some people collect because they have family in the company or use the company's products" says Robert Kerstein (Bob.com), who runs Scripophily.com, a Web site dedicated to bond and stock certificates. The certificates are given as retirement presents, collected, and used to add spice to offices. Buyers have included collectors from the UK, Spain and Russia, says Kerstein.

      In his history of the pastime entitled "Scripophily: The Art of Finance," Keith Hollender estimates that there are some 100,000 collectors, 200 dealers and 20 to 30 auction houses involved with bond and stock certificates.

      "It makes the history come alive. When you read about these things in a textbook it is different from holding a piece of paper," says John Herzog, co-founder of Herzog Heine Geduld, a leading Nasdaq market maker that was sold to Merrill Lynch in 2000. "This gives you a way to touch different events in American history."

      Herzog, founder of the Museum of American Finance in lower Manhattan, where pieces of his bond and stock collection are exhibited, is an active proponent of scripophily....

      "It's a combination of the history and the beauty of the documents," says Phillip Kass, an Encino, Calif.-based accountant and attorney who collects bond and stock certificates. In his office you will find his prized piece: a 1945 bond issued by "The Government of Palestine" with writing in Hebrew, English and Arabic.

      Some of these Jewish Colonial Trust issues are popular as bar mitzvah gifts, says Kass.

      Kerstein, who was a CFO of a number of companies including Falcon Cable TV in California, Los Angeles Cellular and McCaw Cellular, was smitten by stocks and bonds in the 1990s when he went to a Civil War memorabilia convention. He purchased a bond issued by the Confederate States with an image of Stonewall Jackson and then started collecting civil war scrip, eventually moving on to stock certificates.

      In 1995, Kerstein was involved with building a net presence for Orca Bay Sports and Entertainment, owners of the Vancouver Grizzlies and the Vancouver Canucks. He set up the first NHL and NBA team Web sites and that experience of working on the Internet prompted him to open up a Web site devoted to historic bond and stock certificates.

      When it comes to paper issued by Enron, "we sold Enron certificates to short sellers. They made so much money, they wanted to keep a certificate," says Kerstein. "Some people who lost money wanted a certificate. A 'Wall Street diploma' is what we call it."

      Some of the certificates are prized not just because of the history of the issuing companies, but also because of the signatures on the bonds. For example, a Standard Oil Trust stock certificate with a signature by John D. Rockefeller will sell for $3,000. Some Standard Oil Co. certificates have been sold for as much as $8,000 because the oil company preceded the trust as an issuing entity and some of these issues are among the earliest sold by Standard Oil.

      One of those owners of the Standard Oil scrip with Rockefeller's signature is Malcolm Epstein, a stock broker with Smith Moore & Co. in Jefferson City, Mo.

      The bonds in his collection, Epstein says, "are ornate and I see no reason they should not be considered art."

      Indeed, the certificates themselves are of high quality paper with engravings, some of them created by cutting into copper or steel. The manufacturers of many of these certificates were often companies that printed bank notes and postage stamps, Hollender says in his history of the hobby.

      Outside of the US, certificates from the late 1920s offer touches of Art Deco style while earlier pieces have Art Nouveau-inspired ornamentation.

      Another big seller in recent years has been scrip from Buckeye Steele Castings which features a signature from President George Bush's great-grandfather, Samuel Prescott Bush. Demand for these rose when President Bush was elected, and shortly after the 9-11 attacks. Now, though, demand for these particular issues has waned because either Bush presidency is soon to end or because of a decline in his popularity, according to Kerstein. ...

      Collectors do not only value scrip issued by US companies; Russian railway bonds -- issued in the days of the Czars -- and Chinese railway bonds issued prior to the birth of Communist China are also popular.

      The story of the Russian Czarist-era debt is an interesting one. At the time of the Russian Revolution in 1917, well over one billion pounds sterling worth of Russian debt was outstanding, but the newly created communist state refused to honor the debt. In 1986, Britain and the former Soviet Union announced a settlement for bond holders who were not paid after the fall of the Czar. The agreement between Britain and the former Soviet Union used money that belonged to the Russian Imperial family and had been frozen in Britain in 1917.

      Also popular with collectors are issues from World War II-era Germany and Japan, according to Kerstein. Some Japanese World War II-era certificates have illustrations of warplanes and ships. Some issues are even stamped with a note commemorating Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

      World War I Liberty bonds are popular, as are World War II savings bonds. Interestingly, those savings bonds are worth more if they are cashed in because they collected interest even after World War II.

      "World War II Series E savings bonds are worth two or three times face value as a collectible, but if redeemed they are worth four or five times face value," says Kerstein. The face value of these Liberty Savings bonds range from $25 to $1,000. The higher the denomination the scarcer the bond.

      The phrase scripophily came into being after a 1978 Financial Times contest aimed to come up with a term for the love of collecting bonds and stock certificates. "Scrip" is the ownership of stock and "opholy" is a derivative of the Greek term of love -- philos.

      Enron shares are not the only scrip in demand for a company or business that fails dramatically. Kerstein says he has sold South Sea Co. transfer certificates and there have even been issues from Keely Motor Co., a business set up to create a fictitious perpetual motion machine powered by water in the 1880s.

      For those investors who think getting a price on a bond is tough in these market conditions, they ought to consider how collectors track the value of certain scrip years after it was issued.

      Some of these collectors have traced the value of Confederate bonds backed by bails of cotton in 1863. This debt initially sold at 90 cents, or 90% of par value, but after the Battle of Vicksburg, the Mississippi River's traffic was disrupted and an important route for Southern cotton was disrupted. As a result, Confederate debt backed by cotton fell to 15 cents on the dollar.

      It is the kind of event risk that has been seen on more than one Wall Street emerging markets trading desk in the last two decades.

      Collectors of scrip, meanwhile, may soon be able to squeeze the market for collectible stocks and bonds. These days, issuance of bonds or stocks in their traditional format has dropped as more securities are issued electronically.

      While stock and bond collectors typically focus on old issuers, Kerstein says the subprime crisis and all the attention it has gotten have prompted inquiries about scrip from mortgage lenders that have gone bust.

      "I wish I had stock of companies involved in subprime, but they don't have them."

      Bad Market, Good Crowds

      Maybe it's a way to piece together what is happening to their 401K plans or private stock portfolios but, believe it or not, bad news about the financial markets usually brings in more visitors to the Museum of American Finance.

      "We always did better during market downturns in terms of the number of visitors," says Kristin Aguilera, a spokeswoman for the museum, which is located in lower Manhattan on Wall Street.
       

    • LiveMint.com - Wall Street Journal - Money Matters Tue, Dec 18 2007
      Holders hit jackpot as cancelled old shares find online platform - Scripophily is the collection of old bond and share certificates as a pursuit or hobby

      New Delhi: It is not necessary to own shares by actively trading in market to reap rich premiums—even the cancelled share certificates of companies that closed shop long ago are in demand for their historical value.
      New lease of life: A screen shot of the website Scripophily.net
      New lease of life: A screen shot of the website Scripophily.net

      Hundreds of such share certificates are currently on sale over the Internet, including that of Imperial Bank of India, the oldest and largest commercial bank of the Indian subcontinent that later became the State Bank of India (SBI) in 1955.
      Issued in 1953, the certificate for 10 shares of the Imperial Bank of India, is available for Rs400 on EBay India, the local website of the world’s largest online auction giant.
      Share certificates for Bank of Bengal, which was set up in 1809 and is now a part of SBI, is also available online at prices ranging between Rs750 and Rs2,500 per certificate.
      A certificate which is more than 100 years old and was issued in 1878, is being sold for Rs750 on EBay India, while another 85-year-old certificate is available for $39.95 (Rs1,574) on Scripophily.net, another website dedicated to the sale and purchase of historical shares and bonds.
      Scripophily is the collection of old bond and share certificates as a pursuit or hobby, and the person who collects them is known as a scripophilist. The English word scrip means ownership right and the Greek word philos means to love. This hobby has now found a platform with e-commerce websites such as EBay and Scripophily.
      On EBay India, another certificate for Bank of Bengal shares worth Rs4,000 is available for Rs2,500. Another interesting share certificate currently on sale for Rs250, including shipping cost of Rs50, is that of Indian Copper Corp., an England-incorporated private sector company that was nationalized and made part of Hindustan Copper in 1972.
      On Scripophily.net, a 115- year-old certificate from the New Oriental Bank Corporation Ltd, which was issued in 1890, is being sold for $195 (Rs7,683). Founded in 1842 as a joint stock bank, Bank of Western India was reconstituted in 1845 and became Oriental Bank.
      The move apparently followed dissatisfaction among shareholders over the expense and conduct of its UK directors. Later in 1949, it acquired the Bank of Ceylon, but had to close its doors in 1892 after failing to record profits.
      According to EBay India, some of the popular collectible share certificates are of Assam tea companies and textile mills of Ahmedabad and Mumbai.
      The certificates currently available on the website include that of Wadia Woolen Mills issued in 1920, Indian Iron and Steel Co. Ltd issued in 1937, Anderson Wright Ltd issued in 1946, The Bank of Hindustan Ltd issued in 1942, Aryodaya Ginning issued in 1932, The Saraswati Ginning and Manufacturing Co. Ltd issued in 1921 and Shri Ambica Mills Ltd issued in 1968.
      According to scripophilist Pranav Gandhi who has listed 50 cancelled shares and bond certificates on EBay: “It has been very difficult to collect these certificates as people think these companies may restart over a period of time and hence might fetch them a good financial value then.” But, scripophily has given a new lease of life to the certificates of many unsuccessful firms which went bankrupt, thus making them priceless.

       

    • November 27, 2007 - Forget neckties and fruitcakes: This holiday, give a historic gift!

      Vintage stock and bond certificates from Scripophily.com are a unique gift idea that the recipient will never forget

      These original, authentic artifacts of business and political history may date back to the 19th century and are beautifully engraved, with wonderful vignettes (decorative pictures) and ideal for framing. They may represent shares of company stock or funds raised to support public projects, social causes – even war efforts. Older certificates are usually hand signed, sometimes by famous personalities.  

      Bob Kerstein, a former communications executive and now CEO of Scripophily.com, became interested in antique “scrip” – stock and other financial certificates – after seeing Confederate bonds at a Civil War show. He noted that Gilded Age entrepreneurs traveled the country by rail or stagecoach, hawking beautiful, ornately engraved stock certificates in order to raise funds for their corporate ventures.
       

    • Tacoma News Tribune - September 21, 2007 -  Bob Kerstein is a history detective specifically business history, a collecting area that most people don't think about. A former executive at McCaw Cellular in Seattle and now based in Washington, D.C., Kerstein is the CEO of Scripophily.com, a company that sells vintage stock certificates and bonds  each of which has a story. Check out the vignette (the decorative picture)from a First National Bank of Seattle certificate, seen below: It dates from 1884 and is signed by the bank's president, George W. Harris. Not only does the certificate date from territorial days, but the bank would become Seafirst Bank, which would in turn become Bank of America. What's more, Harriswas a founder of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. So it ties in a lot of pieces of history over time,  Kerstein pointed out...
       
    • July 31, 2007 - Morgan Stanley - Important Notice Regarding Issuance of Paper Stock Certificates
       

    • Here are resources for tracing old insurance policies and other financial assets of your deceased loved one:

      Texas Department of Insurance: Its database will tell you the status of an insurance company, how many times it was acquired, when it changed its name and its current structure. You’ll also be able to get contact information for the company.

      You may also obtain the information by calling the department’s consumer help line at 800-252-3439.

      MIB Solutions Inc.: which has a policy locator service for $75 per search. The company will tell you the name and contact information of the insurance company or companies to which your loved one applied for coverage.

      MIB information will also have details about merged or purchased insurance companies so you can identify and contact the successor to the original insurance company.

      Texas Department of Banking: If you’re searching for old bank accounts, the Texas Department of Banking will tell you a bank’s history, whether it’s still operating or has changed its name.

      You may also call Phyllis Teeple at 512-475-1338 for the information.

      Texas Comptroller: An overall good place to search for unknown financial assets is the Texas comptroller’s unclaimed property program.

      These services will conduct searches of old stock certificates:

      Scripophily.com will research old stock certificates for $39.95 per company. Scripophily is the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. (See OldCompany.com)

      R. M. Smythe & Co.: It charges $100 for each company search (For the Same Service as Scripophily.com)

       
    • March 11, 2007  Press-Register Sunday, Get your stocks into an account by K.A. Turner
       
      People in Wilcox County knew Olivia Martin. In fact, said her son Ralph, a string of politicians and community leaders could have easily tied that name back to a "true Southern lady" who had been in Camden for most of her life.

      But none of that has made it easier for Ralph and his family to put his late mother's stock portfolio in order.

      "I don't want people to have to go through what we did," Martin said recently. "If we had just taken her down to the brokerage house ..." Kimberly Clark, Vanity Fair, Bristol-Myers and Olin were among the familiar names on certificates the family found. Others, such as Allegheny Beverage, were more obscure.

      Martin said he has needed death certificates, letters of testamentary and time to convert even the most familiar of issues. For the obscure ones, he looked to the Web.

      The Securities and Exchange Commission's site (http://edgar.sec.gov/answers/oldcer.htm) offers five different options for researching older certificates. Most of the services are fee-based, and the SEC says it "cannot recommend or endorse any of these entities, their personnel, or their products or services."

      No. 1 on the list is http://Scripophily.com, the brainchild of Bob Kerstein, a CPA who logged more than 20 years in financial management of both public and private companies before developing Scripophily and its sister firm, Old Company Research.

      " We probably get about 20 calls a day," from people who find themselves in situations like Martin's, Kerstein said recently.

      The first task, he said, is to determine whether a certificate has redeemable value, or can be turned in to the company or a successor company for cash or updated shares.

      "You generally find the companies have gone away and the certificates are not redeemable," Kerstein said. "You've still probably got better odds with those than the lottery, but the fact they're sitting in the house probably means somebody made a bad investment."

      Even if not redeemable, the certificates could have value to collectors. Typically, he said, that value is based "on demand, supply to some degree, and how it looks, its historical significance and the signatures on the certificate.

      While a stock certificate for Pan American Airlines might be worth $5 or $10, a Standard Oil Trust certificate signed by John D. Rockefeller could be worth $3,000 to $4,000, he said.

      What's the one he'd find most valuable? The first certificate from a company called Wright Aeronautical, founded by a couple of brothers who spent some time in Kitty Hawk, N.C. What's his current favorite? A certificate from Shadyside Operators Inc. that is dated Oct. 29, 1929, the day of the market's most historic crash.


       

    • TheStreet.com - Taking Stock -  By Stanley Greenberg
      11/27/2006 9:53 AM EST

      Numismatists collect coins. Philatelists deal in stamps.

      So what do you call somebody who has a passion for acquiring old stocks and bonds?

      Try scripophilists.  

      Scripophily, pronounced "scrip-af-il-ly," picked up steam as a serious collecting pursuit in the mid-1970s.

      Today there are thousands of collectors worldwide in search of scarce, rare and popular stocks and bonds.

      The word itself is a combination of English -- "scrip" represents an ownership right -- and Greek -- "philos" means to love.

      One person in particular who loves to chase down old securities is Bob Kerstein, founder of Scripophily.com.

      An accountant by trade, Kerstein turned his back on the corporate world in the mid-1990s to launch Scripophily, in order to turn his hobby into what is now the leading Web site for stock collectors.

      "Over the years, there have been millions of companies which needed to raise money to get their businesses started," says the Virginia-based Kerstein. "Each company had their own story as to how they did it. These certificates give us a piece of that story."

      A Good Time to Buy Enron Stock
      Not every corporate story ends happily.

      But just because a stock loses all its value on the open market does not mean that it's not worth anything.

      According to Kerstein, some of his biggest sellers are stock certificates of failed dot-com companies, as well as huge financial frauds like Enron, the second-largest business failure in American history.

      Scripophily offers a number of Enron stocks, including a rare engraved certificate from 1989 signed by its late CEO Kenneth Lay for $375.

      The document has an ornate border around it with a vignette of a man and the company logo.

       An Enron Stock Certificate 
        
       However, this particular stock does not have the telltale crooked "E," as it was issued before Enron switched to its now infamous logo.

      And it's not just stocks.

      Scripophilists search for many variations of equity and debt instruments such as preferred stocks, warrants, cumulative preferred, bonds, zero coupon bonds and long-term bonds.

      And like classic baseball cards or antique stamps, there are many factors that determine the value of an antique financial document including condition, age, historical significance, rarity and the type of engraving process.

      Signatures are also very important in assessing the value of a document, which is why Scripophily is also a popular arena for autograph collectors....

     

    • Thursday November 16, 2006 - Art and Scarcity of Old Stock and Bond Certificates from Scripophily.com Make Unique Gifts for the Holiday Season

      Delaware Law and Stock Exchange Rules Add to Collector Supply Shortage

      WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Scripophily.com ®, the Internet's largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, has seen a 31% increase in sales during the past 12 months ending October 31, 2006 compared the prior year. The increase in activity is primarily due to interest in the historical significance and beauty of stock and bond certificates as well as their relative scarcity according to Scripophily.com's CEO and Founder, Bob Kerstein. "Physical stock and bond certificates are a permanent history of capitalism representing a cross section of the financial markets we know today. Stock certificates are becoming an artifact of the past as the world becomes more digitized."

      ertificates are collected and given as gifts because of their historical significance, beauty and artwork, autographs, notoriety, as well as many other factors. Certificates signed by John D. Rockefeller, J.P. Morgan and George Bush's Great Grandfather, Samuel Prescott Bush are especially popular this year.

      The supply of new certificates reaching the collector market has been substantially reduced due to recent changes in State Laws and Stock Exchanges Rules. Many companies are no longer required to issue physical stock and bond certificates Scripophily (scrip-ah-fil-ly) is the hobby's name of collecting old stock and bond certificates. Values range from a few dollars to more than $100,000 for the rarest. Tens of thousands of Scripophily buyers worldwide include casual collectors, corporate archives, museums and serious collectors.

      Scripophily.com - The Gift of History is the Internet's leading buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates and has had items on loan for display in the Smithsonian's Museum of Financial History in New York, been featured on CNBC, USA Today, Baltimore Sun, Washington Post and in many other media publications. The company also offers an old stock research service at OldCompany.com and also offers high resolution scans for publications. Scripophily.com has over 12,000 different selections including categories such as Frauds, Scandals, Bankruptcies, Dot Coms, as well as the more traditional areas such as Railroads, Telephone, Entertainment, Sports, Manufacturing, Mining, Utilities, Oil and Gas, Retail, Tobacco, Food, Banks, Insurance and others.

      Scripophily.com was founded by Bob Kerstein who has more than 25 years of senior management experience in the Cellular, Cable TV, Satellite, Internet, Professional Sports and Entertainment Industries. Bob is also the President of the Professional Scripophily Traders Association (PSTA).

      For more information on Scripophily.com®, visit www.scripophily.com, http://www.bob.com or call 1-703-579-4209.

       
    • Ask TheStreet: All About Scripophily by Gregg Greenberg by TheStreet.com Staff Reporter 9/21/2006 3:35 PM EDT

      Do companies still issue stock certificates? I rarely hear about them anymore. Thanks, J.B.

      Don't worry, it's not your hearing that's the problem. It's just that stock certificates are quickly becoming a thing of the past, and soon will only be found hanging in people's offices.

      As a result of legislation designed to foster corporate cost-cutting, only a handful of the 50 U.S. states still require public companies to issue physical certificates. Stock brokerage firms and many of the issuing companies enthusiastically support this effort, which is known as "dematerialization."

      The move toward dematerialization seems to be just fine with most investors, who would rather use book-entry stock ownership, where the issuers record all details of ownership electronically. It is more convenient than locking stock certificates away in safe-deposit boxes.

      According to the Securities Industry Association, book-entry ownership can be accomplished by having the securities held in the investor's account at the broker-dealer, a method known as putting it in "street name." Another alternative is the use of the Direct Registration System, where investors can have their positions electronically recorded by the issuer or at their transfer agent.

      AT&T (T) became the first company in the United States to do away with paper certificates. Investors now receive a computer-generated report showing them how many shares they have outstanding.

      For the few investors who still prefer holding their shares in physical form, it can be a very expensive proposition, says Bob Kerstein, founder of Scripophily.com. Scripophily is the hobby of collecting stock and bond certificates.

      To go through a stock broker, says Kerstein, you will have to pay the trading price of the stock, plus the commission the broker charges, plus a stock-issuance fee. Depending on whom you use as a stock broker, the commissions can be anywhere from $15 to $50, and the stock-issuance fee can be anywhere from $50 to $100 per certificate.

      "Due to the high cost of processing, risk of loss of certificates, handling costs, so on, it is clear the trend is toward the elimination of the paper stock certificate," says Kerstein.

      That is certainly helping Kerstein's business. While the supply of new certificates reaching the collector market is dwindling, the hobby of scripophily continues to grow.

      "Over the years, there have been millions of companies which needed to raise money for their businesses," says Kerstein. "And each company had their own story as to how they did it. These certificates give us a piece of that story."

      Like classic baseball cards or antique stamps, there are many factors that determine the value of a stock certificate, including condition, age, historical significance, signatures, rarity and the type of engraving process.

      Despite the move toward electronic ownership, one company that may continue printing stock certificates is Disney (DIS) . The Disney stock certificate features Walt Disney himself surrounded by his classic characters, and is a popular gift for collectors and noncollectors alike.
       
    • Smart Money: September 10, 2006
       
    • By Bruce Williams
      Newspaper Enterprise Association
      September 6, 2006

      Dear Bruce: I have read your columns for years. I followed you on the radio. I have some old stocks from the 1940s and would like to know if they have any value? -- W.S., Lexington, Ky.

      Dear W.S.: There are any number of companies that will be happy, usually for a modest fee, to search your stock certificates and see if they have any value. If you have access to a computer, you can search out companies that will research old stocks for you. Some of them charge a fee, and others are free. Two we found at the Securities and Exchange Commission's Web site: Financial Stock Guide Services, (800) 367-3441, and Scripophily, at (888) 786-2576.

       

    • Money Magazine - September 2006 - The Answer Guy - BY GEORGE MANNS

      Question - My mother-in-law has a 1957 stock certificate for 10 shares of a company called Town & Country Securities and a 1970 notice that the name had changed to Kingsford Industries.  I can't find this company. How do I learn what the stock Is worth?—Don Clement, Virginia Beach

      Answer - Finding a forgotten stock certificate can be; nice little thrill: Until you can get a firm answer, the value of the shares is limited only by your imagination. Hmm, you wonder, wasn't this the company that renamed itself Google in the late '9os? (We'll get to your reality in a moment.)
      The first stop on this kind of treasure hunt your brokerage account.  Brokers will commonly do the detective work on old certificates free of charge as a service for their clients. (Although many brokers use the services of http://www.oldcompany.com for their old stock research)

      No brokerage account? Take a look at the website http://www.oldcompany.com. Run by http://www.scripophily.com a firm that also sells collectible stock certificates, the site charges $39.95 to trace the fate of an old stock or bond. 

      Unfortunately for your family's wealth, research from OldCompany.com indicates that shares in Kingsford, which was out of business by the early 1990s, are worthless. Ah, well. Easy come, easy go.


       
      eBay's Safe Payments Policy got a lot of attention in the press last week when the auction site banned Google's new checkout service. But an incident has at least one seller wondering how closely the list of prohibited services was vetted by eBay.

       


      A screen shot of eBay's list of prohibited payment services

      Bob Kerstein, CEO of Scripophily.com, said the past week "has been hell" for his company, which was included in media reports as being banned by eBay. "We're not a payment service," said Kerstein, and feels the media attention has damaged his company's reputation.

      eBay added Scripophily.com on its list of banned online payment services last week (http://pages.ebay.com/help/policies/accepted-payments-policy.html). One blog published eBay's list of prohibited payment services and said of them, "All of these services have been banned due to being unsafe for eBay buyers, that they are in some way poorly designed or secured and thus aid fraud" (http://digbig.com/4kxef). Major news outlets covered news of eBay's policy updates because of the ban on Google Checkout, widely seen as a competitor to eBay's own PayPal service.

      Kerstein said, "Our company, Scripophily.com, buys and sells collectible stock and bond certificates and I have no idea why eBay listed our company here. If we sell something on eBay, we accept credit cards over the phone, checks, Paypal and credit cards on our website, that's it."

      He said he spent a week trying to get a response from someone at eBay. On July 10, he said Sarah Brubaker, calling herself a senior policy representative of eBay, contacted him and told him Scripophily.com was on the list because "one eBay member said they use the Scripophily.com checkout system" in his or her listing, Kerstein said. Brubaker promised to take his company off the list, he said, but it was still up on Tuesday evening.

      "Why in the world eBay listed us here is beyond me," Kerstein said. "EBay never notified us about any of this." Kerstein's company has been an eBay member since January 1998 and has 4133 feedback points with a 99.9 percent positive feedback rating. Scipophily.com also operates an eBay Store. Feedback from trading partners include such comments as, "Honest description, Sturdy Package, Speedy Delivery" and "Item as described. Smooth transaction. A+++++."

      Kerstein said he wonders what kind of due diligence eBay performed with the companies on its list of prohibited services. He said, "It certainly looks like they just added other companies to the list so Google wouldn't look like they were being singled out."

      What's most upsetting to Kerstein, who once sold a stock certificate to eBay CEO Meg Whitman, is that he "didn't even get an apology" from eBay.

      eBay spokesperson Catherine England explained why the company included Scripophily.com on the prohibited list in an email statement. "Apparently a few sellers had listed Scripophily as a payment method in listings in the past so they were initially included on the list of prohibited payment methods in an effort to provide as much clarity as possible for the community.

      "However, since Scripophily itself makes no attempt to be a payment service, we've determined that it wasn't appropriate for them to be listed as one and they will be removed from the list - since the change is global it may take a few days for it to go live to the site but they should be removed within the week."

      When asked what kind of vetting eBay does before adding a service to the policy's accepted or prohibited list, England responded by providing the list of factors included on eBay's policy, adding, "The combination of factors considered for any one payment service may vary as the range of services offered by different payment providers also varies widely."

      Meanwhile, The Register reports that eBay's rollout of the Safe Payments Policy in the UK on Monday has caused major concern among sellers after the auction site banned Nochex (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/07/11/ebay_nochex_fallout/). Sellers discussed the new policy on several threads on the Discussion boards, including this one (http://forums.ebay.co.uk/thread.jspa?threadID=1100012120).

      The list of "payment services" prohibited on eBay UK also includes Scripophily.com (http://pages.ebay.co.uk/help/policies/accepted-payments-policy.html).



       

    • eBay Watch: eBay Bans Google Checkout By James Maguire July 7, 2006 - It wasn't good news for eBay when Google recently launched its Google Checkout service. Google's new online payment system doesn't compete directly with eBay's Paypal. But who wants to take on Google at all?

      So it's no surprise that eBay amended its rules this week to ban sellers from using Google Checkout. You can see Google listed in the "not permitted" list in eBay's Accepted Payments Policy by clicking on "Some Examples."

      It's a little humorous to see the awesome Google listed in the banned providers list along with the likes of payingfast.com, eHotPay.com, EuroGiro, and scripophily.com.   (According to Bob Kerstein "The joke of this is that Scripophily.com doesn't even have a public checkout system.

      Scripophily.com, buys and sells collectible stock and bond certificates and have no idea why eBay listed our company here. If we sell something on eBay, we accept credit cards over the phone, checks, Paypal and credit cards on our website, that's it.  Why in the world eBay listed us here is beyond me.

       

    • Preserving history, one piece at a time Thursday, June 29, 2006 5:44 PM CDT - ....According to www.scripophily.net, scripophily is the collecting of canceled old stocks and bonds. It is a hobby that gained recognition in the mid-1970s.

      A brief Internet search yielded an abundance of information and Web sites on the hobby. There is even a Professional Scripophily Trade Association, which “is a group of dealers organized to promote the study and collection of antique stocks and bonds for collectors and researchers, and for the interpretation and preservation of financial history,” according to www.scripophilynews.com....
       

    • Chicago Tribune Andrew Leckey, a Tribune Media Services columnist - June 7, 2006
      Q. I have some old stock certificates of mining companies. How do I determine if they have any value?

      --D.T., via the Internet

      A....Over the years I've heard from owners of hundreds of mining stock certificates discovered in desks and attics...

      To research a company, start on the Internet to see if you can find out what happened to it. Next, contact the transfer agent on the back of the certificate, if it still exists. Check with the secretary of state's office in the state in which the firm was incorporated.

      Books available in public libraries, such as "Moody's Industrial Manual," could help.

      If you're willing to pay a fee of $39.95 per company, Scripophily (or Old Company) - 888-786-2576 will research your certificate to see if it has any value. If it fails to uncover what happened to the company, it won't charge you. If it likes your certificate as a collectible, it may offer to buy it.
       
    • THE BOND BUYER - N.Y., N.Y. THE DAILY NEWSPAPER OF PUBLIC FINANCE Friday, March 24,2006
      Scripophily: Old Paper Finds New Fans - Call it Antiquing For the Muni Set....
      In 1990, Bob Kerstein was the chief financial officer of the cellular division of a large wireless telecommunications company when he attended a Civil War trade show and took note of some bonds issued by the Confederacy. "I remember going to that show and saying to myself what a worthless piece of paper," said Kerstein, who lives in northern Virginia. "But then I looked at it again and said what a neat worthless piece of paper. "It is kind of scary when you see it in writing and you go: Wow, there really was a Civil War, and they really did have to raise money, and that forces you to dig into it and find out what it was all about," Kerstein said. "I just got hooked from there." 

      Today, Kerstein owns what he says has become the largest Web-based an-tique stock and bond selling business.
      After AT&T purchased the cell phone company he worked for in 1994, Kerstein became chief information officer for Vancouver, B.C.'s professional hockey and basketball teams, helping them to become the first in their respective leagues to launch sites on the Internet. In 1996, he purchased the domain name scripophily.com. Kerstein said his experience in Canada was instrumental in helping him to create the Web site.

      The advent of the Internet in recent years has made it much easier for scripophilists looking for old securities to find them through Web sites like his. While municipal bonds represent only a small portion of the antique securities available to scripophilists, they attract quite a bit of interest from buyers on the site, according to the 54-year old Kerstein.

      While there are plenty of people out there looking to buy antique municipals, locating old certificates to keep his Chantilly, Va.-based business stocked is a "labor of love," according to Kerstein. "I find them every place imaginable," Kerstein said. "We find people going through old archives, file cabinets, turning down homes and warehouses. "People acquire old buildings and they find boxes in the back that have old bonds in them and because we are so prevalent on the internet, the people do a search for bond certificates and we come up," he added. "I wish there was a wholesaler. It is a long laborious process buying stuff — that is for sure."

      Creating a system for authenticating the antique paper is another cause to which Kerstein has dedicated much of his time. He currently serves as the president of the Professional Scripophily Trade Association, which is primarily a group of dealers organized to promote the study and collection of antique stocks and bonds for collectors and researchers, and for the interpretation and preservation of financial history. "We want to give the customers a group of people who are trusted sellers of the certificates so they are not buying duplicates (reproductions)" Kerstein said.

      Valuing antique municipals its another service that Kerstein offers his clients. "Many times, companies come to us to see about what these are worth," Kerstein said. "It is naturally based on previous sales, historical significance, the artistic work on the bond," he added. "If it is signed by somebody famous it adds value." Rarer bonds are often more valuable as well, according to Kerstein. The average cost for antique municipal paper is between $20 and $200, and some of the more unique paper can range up to $1,000, he added. "It just depends on your budget, the rarity of the certificate and what we pay for it."
      "Many different types of people buy municipal bonds," he said. "They buy them to decorate their offices. They buy them as gifts. They buy them because of the historical significance of a particular area. "Sometimes people buy them and donate them to the local museums ... and sometimes their family name is on the certificate or they had a relative who is affiliated with the bond's associated project," Kerstein added....


       
    • Forbes.com Inc - London 3/19/2006 - Windfalls. Is investing really just about the $$$? Perhaps not if your definition of a shareholder is someone who procures their company stock in a fetching choice of black lacquer or mahogany frames.

      Scripophily, or the collection of old stock certificates, is all the rage these days for collectors, I-love-business types, or anyone baffled for a suitable gift idea. That means that as records become increasingly digitized, online vendors are cashing in on companies whose stock has that extra bit of shareholder value--you know, the sentimental kind.

      Who else but Steve Jobs is the object of the latest fad. Collectors have been hitting the Web to snap up stock certificates of Pixar (nasdaq: PIXR - news - people ), the hugely successful computer animation firm that the trendy chief executive and billionaire has sold to The Walt Disney Company (nyse: DIS - news - people ).

      The certificates, peppered with an array of characters including Toy Story's Woody and Buzz Lightyear, are becoming increasingly covetable as Pixar looms closer to complete absorption into the Disney fold.

      Wondering how much an exclusive piece of Pixar could set you back? Pixar's share price may be hovering around the $65 mark, but a single framed stock certificate proffered by one online vendor costs a cool $150--it does come with custom-engraved plaque, after all.

      Other popular certificates include Harley-Davidson (nyse: HDI - news - people ), Ford Motor (nyse: F - news - people ), Coca-Cola (nyse: KO - news - people ), Starbucks (nasdaq: SBUX - news - people ), Microsoft (nasdaq: MSFT - news - people ), Apple Computer (nasdaq: AAPL - news - people ), and of course, Enron.

      Pixar was popular even before its Disney deal was announced, but sellers are using the imminent close of that sale to step up their sales pitches. "Less than 60 days before Pixar stock vanishes!" one Web site harks. More...

      Pixar Animation Studios Inc.'s upcoming sale to Walt Disney Co. has inspired an audience of investors more interested in buying a piece of paper than a piece of the $7.4 billion deal....


      Stock certificates used to be the standard way of denoting ownership in a publicly held company, but that has changed dramatically during the past decade as the securities industry has shifted to electronic record-keeping to reduce costs.

      The Depository Trust & Clearing Corp., which settles most U.S. stock trades, now has just 3.4 million stock certificates in its vaults, down from roughly 30 million in 1990.

      Certificates are expected to become even more rare with the passage of a new law last year in Delaware, where more than half of the nation's publicly traded companies are incorporated because of the state's favorable business rules. Delaware has dropped a requirement forcing all companies to issue stock certificates, making the choice optional.

      The rise of paperless record keeping is helping to popularize scripophily - the collection of old stock and bond certificates.

      Some of these collectors are strictly in it for the money, hoping to come across something as valuable as vintage Standard Oil Co. stock certificates issued in the 19th century.

      Some of Standard Oil's 1873 certificates, signed by John D. Rockefeller, have fetched anywhere from $8,500 to $130,000 apiece, said Bob Kerstein, who runs Scripophily.com, which has become a magnet for collectors.

      Other collectors are just looking for a memento that sums up a particular era. That's one reason why the stock certificates of Enron Corp. - an emblem of corporate scandal - were recently listed on Scripophily for prices ranging from $49.95 to $375. Enron's stock disintegrated in late 2001 when the company went bankrupt.

      It also helps to have a flashy certificate. That factor seems to be driving demand for eToys Inc., a relic of the dot-com boom that went bankrupt in 2001. Its ornate certificate, featuring toys alongside its red-and-blue logo, demands $125 to $250.

      Even before the Disney sale, Pixar was among a handful of companies whose stock certificates have been a perennial favorite.

      Other high-demand stock certificates include Harley-Davidson Inc., Ford Motor Co., Dreamworks Animation SKG Inc., Tiffany & Co., Coca-Cola Co., Starbucks Inc., Microsoft Inc. and Apple Computer Inc.

       
    • Sun, Mar. 19, 2006 - Pixar's sale to Disney animates collectors of stock certificates - MICHAEL LIEDTKE - Associated Press

      Pixar Animation Studios Inc.'s upcoming sale to Walt Disney Co. has inspired an audience of investors more interested in buying a piece of paper than a piece of the $7.4 billion deal....Stock certificates used to be the standard way of denoting ownership in a publicly held company, but that has changed dramatically during the past decade as the securities industry has shifted to electronic record-keeping to reduce costs.

      The Depository Trust & Clearing Corp., which settles most U.S. stock trades, now has just 3.4 million stock certificates in its vaults, down from roughly 30 million in 1990. Certificates are expected to become even more rare with the passage of a new law last year in Delaware, where more than half of the nation's publicly traded companies are incorporated because of the state's favorable business rules. Delaware has dropped a requirement forcing all companies to issue stock certificates, making the choice optional.

      The rise of paperless record keeping is helping to popularize Scripophily - the collection of old stock and bond certificates.

      Some of these collectors are strictly in it for the money, hoping to come across something as valuable as vintage Standard Oil Co. stock certificates issued in the 19th century.

      Some of Standard Oil's 1873 certificates, signed by John D. Rockefeller, have fetched anywhere from $8,500 to $130,000 apiece, said Bob Kerstein, who runs Scripophily.com, which has become a magnet for collectors.

      Other collectors are just looking for a memento that sums up a particular era. That's one reason why the stock certificates of Enron Corp. - an emblem of corporate scandal - were recently listed on Scripophily for prices ranging from $49.95 to $375. Enron's stock disintegrated in late 2001 when the company went bankrupt.

       
    • Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 1pm - Scripophily.com's CEO, Bob Kerstein was featured on George Chamberlin NEWSRADIO 600 KOGO San Diego's EXCLUSIVE NewsTalk Radio Station discussing the Hobby of Scripophily and Old Stock Research Services at OldCompany.com
       
    • Yahoo News Service - Tuesday March 14, 8:00  - Scarcity of Old Stock and Bond Certificates Contributes to Scripophily.com's Best Year Ever

      New Delaware Law Adds to Collector Supply Shortage

      WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--March 14, 2006--Scripophily.com®, the Internet's largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, has seen a 30% increase in sales and a 24% increase in website traffic during the 12 months ending February 28, 2006 compared the prior year. The increase in activity is primarily due to the scarcity of certain certificates according to Scripophily.com's CEO and Founder, Bob Kerstein. "Obtaining previously unseen stock certificates is becoming harder and harder to accomplish," says Mr. Kerstein. "With the change in the laws in Delaware and on major Stock Exchanges, publicly traded companies are no longer required to issue physical stock certificates, but simply keep track by ledger entries. This has made is more difficult to obtain new certificates," Kerstein added.
      ADVERTISEMENT

      According to the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation, paper stock certificates cost companies, investors, banks and brokers hundreds of millions of dollars each year to print, register, ship, examine, file and keep safe, even though they're involved in only about one-tenth of one percent of all trades daily on U.S. markets. One recent study by the Securities Industry Association puts the annual cost of handling paper stock certificates at $250 million or more. This is why most companies want the physical certificates eliminated. This is contributing to the demand of Scripophily (Stock and Bond Certificates) as well as increased prices of harder to find items.

      Scripophily (scrip-ah-fil-ly) is the hobby's name of collecting old stock and bond certificates. Historical certificates which otherwise have no redeemable value as financial claims, are bought for their artistic and historical value by collectors. Values range from a few dollars to more than $100,000 for the rarest. Tens of thousands of Scripophily buyers worldwide include casual collectors, corporate archives, museums and serious collectors.

      Scripophily.com LLC, The Gift of History, is the internet's leading buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates and has had items on loan for display in the Smithsonian's Museum of Financial History in New York, been featured on CNBC, USA Today, Baltimore Sun, Washington Post and in many other media publications. The company offers an old stock research service at OldCompany.com and also offers high resolution scans for publications. Scripophily.com was founded by Bob Kerstein (Bob.com) who has more than 25 years of senior management experience in the Cellular, Cable TV, Satellite, Internet, Professional Sports and Entertainment Industries. Bob is also the President of the Professional Scripophily Traders Association (PSTA).

      Scripophily.com® has experienced over 17.9 Million page views on its websites during the past 12 months. There are over 10,000 different selections including categories such as Frauds, Scandals, Bankruptcies, Dot Coms, as well as the more traditional areas such as Railroads, Telephone, Entertainment, Sports, Manufacturing, Mining, Utilities, Oil and Gas, Retail, Tobacco, Food, Banks, Insurance and others.

      For more information on Scripophily.com®, visit www.scripophily.com, or call 1-703-579-4209.
       
    • Scripophily.com's High Resolution archive scanning service is used by Business Week in January 2006.  Scripophily.com has an extensive archive of images of Stock and Bond Certificates that have been used by major news organizations and publications.  Our library has over 13000 images and we have supplied many of the major broadcasting, print and publishing companies around the world with our images relating to current news stories and articles.  For information you can call us directly at 1.703.579.4209.
       

      Image provided by Scripophily.com used in Business Week January 2006.

       

    • January 31, 2006 - United shareholders left out in cold By: GEORGE CHAMBERLIN - For the North County Times
    • .....The collection of financial documents such as stock certificates has become quite popular. Scripophily, as it's called, has been around for a long time, but really took off after the tech stock crash of 2000.

      One Web site ---- www.scripophily.net ---- offers a collection of eight stock certificates that it calls the "Hall of Shame Package of Companies That Changed America." It includes Enron, DrKoop.com, Global Crossing, Kmart, Webvan.com and several other big losers that cost investors millions of dollars.....
       
    • January 4, 2006 Scarcity of Old Stock and Bond Certificates - Contributes to Scripophily.com’s Best Year Ever New Delaware law is contributing towards elimination of Stock Certificates and Collector Supply Shortage

      WASHINGTON, DC -
      Scripophily.com ®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, has seen a 30% increase in sales and a 24% increase in website traffic during the year ending December 31, 2005 compared the prior year.  The increase in activity is primarily due to the scarcity of certain certificates according to Scripophily.com’s CEO and Founder, Bob Kerstein.  “Obtaining previously unseen stock certificates is becoming harder and harder to accomplish” says Mr. Kerstein.  “With the change in the laws in Delaware and on the major Stock Exchanges, most publicly traded companies are no longer required to issue physical stock certificates, but simply keep track by ledger entries.  This has made is more difficult to obtain new certificates”, Kerstein added.


       

    • Sacramento Bee Columnist  Friday, November 25, 2005
      Hold 'em or fold 'em? No easy answers with General Motors bonds By Jack Sirard
      ....

      Q: My father died five years ago. In his house, I found around 700 shares of Banning Oil Co., incorporated January 1921.I have searched the Internet for information and can't come up with anything. Someone told me they thought it was tied in someway with Standard Oil. Do you have any insight? - Greg S., Sacramento

      A: When it comes to information on old stock and bond certificates, I like to rely on Bob Kerstein, president of Virginia-based Oldcompany.com and Scripophily.com.

      His 10-year-old company is named after the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. For a fee ($39.95), the company - like others in the field - will research whether your stock or bond certificate has any value.

      As Kerstein points out, it can be exciting when someone comes upon an old stock certificate because there's always a chance that the stock will be worth a bundle. But before you get too excited, you should know that in most cases, old stock certificates prove to be worthless, says Kerstein, whose company bills itself as the Internet's biggest buyer and seller of collectible stock certificates.

      "I can't tell you how many times I've been told by someone that they think their stock was linked to Standard Oil," he says. "But inevitably, that doesn't prove to be the case." Unfortunately, he says, that appears to be the case with Banning Oil. "The stock doesn't show up in our databases, nor is it in any of our books. The chances are that the stock is not worth anything," he adds.

      The biggest problem in researching old stocks is that there is no single database to go to for information. To get started, Kerstein advises investors to do a Google search for the company listed on their stock certificate. You also might be able to find information for free at your public library.

      His advice is to frame the stock, particularly if it has a family name on it. You could then hand it down as a great piece of collectible family art, he says.

    • USA TODAY 11/18/2005  by John Waggoner  They'll appreciate holiday gifts that might appreciate

      Face it: Most financial gifts are as appealing as discount coupons for gym socks. But not all financial gifts have to be boring. In fact, with a little effort, you can find some gifts that your loved ones will appreciate — and that may appreciate in value, too.

      .....Or consider antique stock certificates. The scandal-minded can get an Enron stock certificate for $29.95 at scripophily.com, which is $29.95 more than it's worth on the stock exchange. Nevertheless, it's a conversation piece, particularly since it has the crooked "E" logo. (For ironic Enron memorabilia, though, it's hard to beat the coffee mugs inscribed with the Enron "Ask Why," marketing slogan. They sometimes turn up on eBay, the online auctioneer.)

      Some stock certificates are valuable because of the signatures on them. For example, a company called Bayouboys Limited issued a stock certificate signed by Truman Capote, author of In Cold Blood and subject of the recent movie Capote. You can buy the certificate for $595 on scripophily.com.

      If that's too rich for your blood, look for stocks related to a person's interests, says Bob Kerstein, president of scripophily.net. For example, he sells a package of certificates from the four railroads in Monopoly — Cleveland Short Line, Pennsylvania, Reading and, Baltimore and Ohio railroads — for $39.95.

      Of course, there's no guarantee that any of these will make money. For that, you'll need a Savings Bond. But combining the two could be good for fun and profit — and what's wrong with that?
       

    • Village Voice November 15th, 2005 - Elements of Style Taking the Fifth H&M, A&F, and Fendi by Lynn Yaeger

      Apparently just one party isn't sufficient to mark the 80th anniversary of the house of Fendi......

      Far more authentically vintage is a showcase displaying old skis, lacrosse shoes, and other well-worn sporting equipment. Is this an homage to the old Abercrombie & Fitch [www.scripophily.net], a much loved blue-blood sporting goods store on Madison Avenue in the 40s that went out of business decades ago? That place, with its stock of tweed hacking coats, khaki safari jackets, and an entire floor of guns never felt the need to rely on a half-naked boy toy in a doorway....

       

    • Argus Leader 11/7/05 - Theater chain was popular in 1900s 1913 theater sees boom in bookings by JAY KIRSCHENMANN

      Music, theater, comedy and jazz are finding the Orpheum Theater's stage so much to their liking that the 1913 structure is poised to break booking records in the coming year. The lively schedule, which this year hit 124 bookings, is a far cry from the dim financial struggles that closed the former Sioux Falls Community Playhouse in 2002. The city bought the theater at 315 N. Phillips Ave. and has invested in updating the historic building. In 2006, the city plans to spend nearly $1.1 million in what is the next stage of the theater's rebirth.

      ...Many of the Orpheum Theatres were originally associated with the Keith Albee Orpheum vaudeville circuit, or later the Radio Keith Orpheum company, also known as RKO, creators of "King Kong" and other classic films, according to Bob Kerstein of Scripophily, a company that sells stock and bond certificates from historic companies across the country. The theater group was named after "Orpheus," the son of one of the Muses and a Thracian prince, although some stories say he was the son of Morpheus and Calliope. Orpheus was a musician and poet. He is also considered to be the founder of Orphism, an ancient Greek cult that stressed the transmigration of souls, moral and ritual purity, and individual responsibility for guilt, Kerstein said....
       
    • Orlando Sentinel November 6, 2005 Aeroscripophilists grab airline papers - Stock certificates are a hot commodity for these collectors....He (Kerstein) has a Web site, www.scripophily.com, where most of his sales are made -- 5,000 to 10,000 items a year, with the aviation kind comprising about 10 percent to 15 percent.

      Most companies no longer automatically issue stock papers, leaving transactions to be conducted and recorded electronically. Some will issue buyers paper, but for a fee of $30 to $50....

       
    • Baltimore Sun -November 3, 2005 - Airline stocks sought for their paper value by Meredith Cohn - The airline industry is the focus of aeroscripophilists, who collect financial papers with ties to aviation. ...Hobbyists have long collected other scripophily in industries ranging from railroads to automobiles. But the troubled airline industry has recently been attracting their attention and cash.

      ..They are the fan base of the long-gone, the merged, the failing, the once-and-maybe-still high flying. Those who assign more value to what an airline prints than what an airline makes and who like the pictures, famous signatories and distinctive engraving, generally more than their investment prospects...."Such a hobby is not mainstream, yet" said Robert A. Kerstein, a Northern Virginia collector and broker as well as head of the Professional Scripophily Trade Association. "Most people just frame them and hang them on the wall."

      ...He has a Web site, www.scripophily.com, where most of his sales are made - some 5,000 to 10,000 items a year, with the aviation kind making up about 10 percent to 15 percent...Kerstein, a history buff and former financial executive at an aviation company, says the niche is filled with a range of people. Many just want to hold a small, tangible piece of history in an electronic age. Some worked for an airline or had a family member who worked for one.

    • Minneapolis, Star Tribune - November 2, 2005 Determining the value of old stocks and bonds by Karen Youso:

      Q I inherited some old stocks and bonds. How do I know if they're any good?

      A It takes a little research. Even if the stock or bond is no longer traded under the name printed on the certificate, it may be valuable, because:

      •The company may have merged with another company or simply changed its name.

      •Some certificates have collectible value.

      You can research the stock at public libraries, or through stock exchanges or a stockbroker's office. In addition, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission suggests, but does not endorse, the following resources:

      Scripophily.com (www.scripophily.com): The company is named after the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. For a fee, Scripophily.com researches whether your stock or bond certificate has any value. The company also is a large buyer and seller of collectible certificates, with a list and images of more than 4,500 companies. Or write Scripophily.com, Box 223795, Chantilly, VA 20153....
       

    • AERO SCRIPOPHILIACS - WHO WOULD BUY AVIATION STOCK THAT'S NOT WORTH THE PAPER IT'S PRINTED ON? BY ROGER A. MOLA October/November 2005 Air & Space Magazine

      ...In his office in suburban Virginia, Bob Kerstein presents his original 1936 A-1 for Bell Aircraft, with its pristine specimens and signatures of President Lawrence Bell and all officers. Kerstein's Web site, scripophily.com, currently lists 10,000 items. "Here's another cool one! " he says, flipping through a milk crate to fmd documents from Bonanza Airlines, a 1960s-era commuter line connecting Los Angeles with Las Vegas that Kerstein flew on regularly as a youngster. Another of Kerstein's treasures is a framed certificate issued in 1915 to Orville Wright, a stake of 440 shares signed by Wright's sister, Katharine, as secretary and by brother Lorin Wright as vice president. "It's a copy, or else it would sell for at least $30,000." He pauses, then lowers his voice. "At least, I think it ' s a copy Lacking the signature of a celebrity or obvious historical value, a certificate can sometimes attract an investor by the sheer quirkiness of the concept, product, or scheme it represents. Kerstein even relishes the artifacts of a scam. His Gray Goose Airways prospectus, written by inventor and pitclunan Jonathan E. Caldwell, brags: "Ours is one of the greatest opportunities yet offered." The Gray Goose was to take off with flapping wings and cruise with gas mileage of 100 miles per gallon. Today's poor investment may be tomorrow's collectible. But with more and more stocks being registered and transferred electronically, paper certificates are on their way out altogether. And the disappearance will only increase the value of paper now in circulation  

       

    • WMAL, WTNT Financial Guru and Scripophily Collector Rick Malone Dies - 10/5 - Richard Malone (right), 48, a stock market adviser to AM radio listeners as well as a senior vice president at Reston's Ferris, Baker, Watts, died 10/2 after he slipped and fell at his home in Falls Church. Fairfax County police said the death was accidental. Known on air as "Rick," Malone was the stock market guru on "The Wise Investor Show," which he co-hosted with Randy Beeman on Saturday mornings on WTNT (570 AM) and Sunday mornings on WMAL (630 AM). WMAL General Manager Chris Berry told the Washington Post that Malone built a loyal fan base because listeners knew that he put his money behind the stocks he recommended. "His show was popular with people who enjoyed playing the market," said Ric Edelman, who hosts a financial show Saturday mornings on WMAL.....Rick was also a well known Scripophily Collector specializing in Old Oil Companies and will be dearly missed by everyone who knew him.

     

    • New Delaware law is another step towards elimination of Stock Certificates - Scripophily.com reports that effective August 1, 2005, Delaware Companies are no longer required to issue Stock Certificates.  The new rules eliminates the requirement that a corporation with uncertificated shares issue a certificate for such shares upon the request of the holder of such shares.  Notwithstanding this amendment, a corporation with uncertificated shares still is permitted to issue a certificate upon the request of a holder, but the corporation is not obligated to do so. This is consistent with the process known as dematerializationwhich is the elimination of paper certificates.  According to the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation, paper stock certificates cost companies, investors, banks and brokers hundreds of millions of dollars each year to print, register, ship, examine, file and keep safe, even though theyre involved in only about one-tenth of one percent of all trades daily on U.S. markets. One study, released by the Securities Industry Association (SIA) last year, puts the annual cost of handling paper stock certificates at $250 million or more.

      The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation also noted that electronic ownership of securities are not only more economical, but much safer. Well over a million paper securities are reported lost, stolen or counterfeit each year, according to the Securities Information Center, which helps investors replace missing stock certificates. On 9/11, some $16 billion worth of certificates disappeared in the collapse of the World Trade Center towers, and it took many months of record-checking and millions of dollars to replace them. Electronic shares, in contrast, were not affected at all.

      The two states and one territory still require companies to issue paper certificates are Arizona, Louisiana, and Puerto Rico.

       
    • The Star-Ledger - New Jersey Wednesday, July 20, 2005- Ask the Biz Brain
      My father-in-law recently died. While going through his possessions, I found some stock certificates that he bought over 30 years ago. How can I find out if these stocks have any current value?
       
      Bewildered in Bloomingdale
      The folks the Securities and Exchange Commission hear this kind of question so often, they've dedicated an entire section on their Web site to this very topic.
      So, you are in luck.

      As it turns out, stock or bond certificates may still be valuable even if they no longer trade under the name printed on the certificate or the company has merged with another company or simply changed its name.

      The SEC has provided a list resources to help investors just like yourself find out if old stock or bond certificates have value.
       
      You can find these resources on the Internet, at public libraries, stock exchanges or stockbrokers' offices.

      1) Scripophily.com -- The company is named after the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. For a $39.95 fee per company, Scripophily.com researches whether your stock or bond certificate has any value. Its telephone number is (703) 579-4209.
       
      2.) Financial Stock Guide Service -- This comprehensive guide is a good starting point for all research on old stock certificates. This listing, updated annually, contains a directory of actively traded stocks and obsolete securities. The Custom Research department of Financial Information be reached at (800) 367-3441.
       
    • 3) Robert D. Fisher Manual of Valuable & Worthless Securities. Published by R.M. Smythe & Co., this is a multi-volume resource that is particularly helpful guide if you are trying to trace the value of old stock certificates.
       
      And remember, even if you learn a certificate has no value, you may find the certificate itself has value as a collectable. Good luck!


       
    • JULY 13TH, 2005 -  CNBC’s David Faber, the first to break the news of massive fraud at WorldCom, will anchor a one-hour primetime documentary that will tell the story of the largest fraud in U.S. corporate history, a fraud that surpassed $11 billion, and the bankruptcy that it forced was likewise the largest ever. “The Big Lie: Inside the Rise and Fraud of WorldCom” will also provide an inside look into the beginning and end of WorldCom, and it’s former CEO Bernard Ebbers. Stock Certificates shown in special supplied by  SCRIPOPHILY.COM.
       
    • NEW YORK--May 24, 2005 - Delaware Law Change Will Save Investors Millions of Dollars; DTCC Says National Drive to Eliminate Paper Certificates Picking up Steam -

      By eliminating its legal requirement that companies issue paper stock certificates, Delaware's state legislature will save investors and companies millions of dollars a year, said Jill M. Considine, chairman and CEO of The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC), which handles the post-trade processing and settlement of securities transactions for most U.S. markets.

      Delaware was one of five states still requiring public companies incorporated in the state to issue paper certificates for equities, which are the last financial instruments still using physical ownership records. Virtually all other securities today - including corporate and municipal bonds, U.S. government securities, money-market instruments, futures, options and mutual funds - are issued and traded in a paperless, electronic format that allows for automated processing and safekeeping.

      Paper stock certificates cost companies, investors, banks and brokers hundreds of millions of dollars each year to print, register, ship, examine, file and keep safe, even though they're involved in only about one-tenth of one percent of all trades daily on U.S. markets. One study, released by the Securities Industry Association (SIA) last year, puts the annual cost of handling paper stock certificates at $250 million or more.

      The SIA has been leading the securities industry's effort on "dematerialization"--the elimination of paper certificates. "Since DTCC's subsidiary is the world's largest securities depository and holds in custody securities valued at more than $28 trillion, we are actively supporting the SIA in achieving this shared objective," Considine said.

      The two states and one territory that still require companies to issue paper certificates are Arizona, Louisiana, and Puerto Rico.
       

    • Los Angeles Times - Your Money - ...Most old stock certificates found in attics are worthless, especially those of mining, utility, carmaker and department store firms felled by the Depression. However, some stocks of firms that merged, changed names or exited bankruptcy may have investment value. Others could have historical or artistic value.

      "If you research a certificate and find what happened to the company, put a note on it before you stick it in a safe deposit box," advised Bob Kerstein, CEO of Scripophily.com, a Fairfax, Va., firm that charges $39.95 per stock search to find details about the certificate's company. "You'll be doing your heirs a big favor."...

       
    • April 24, 2005 - Chicago Tribune by Andrew Leckey "TAKING STOCK"
      Question: I recently discovered some old stock certificates in my family belongings. How can I find out if these companies are still in business and if the stock has any value? 

      Answer: ..
      some stocks of firms that merged, changed names or exited bankruptcy may have investment value. Others could have historical or artistic value.

      "If you research a certificate and find what happened to the company, put a note on it before you stick it in a safe deposit box," advised Bob Kerstein, CEO of Scripophily.com, a Fairfax, Va., firm that charges $39.95 per stock search to find details about the certificate's company. "You'll be doing your heirs a big favor."

      .....Scripophily.com has an old certificate for Houdini Pictures Corp. signed by escape artist Harry Houdini that's valued at $5,000. Houdini's move into the motion picture business didn't prove magical, and his firm went bankrupt.

      See OldCompany.com for Stock Certificate Research Services.
    • Friday, March 25, 2005 - Sacramento Bee, Jack Sirard: Tracking old stock certificates... It's always exciting when someone comes upon an old stock certificate because there's always a chance that the stock will prove to be worth a small fortune. Even though an old stock no longer trades under the name on the certificate, it may still be valuable. The company could have changed its name or been taken over by another company. 

      Scripophily.com is named after the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. For a fee ($39.95 - OldCompany.com), the company - like others in the field - will research whether your stock or bond certificate has any value.  "We will tell them what happened to their company and how to get in touch with any successor companies," Kerstein says.
       

    • March 3, 2005  8PM - CNN "People in the News" Hosted by Paula Zahn profiles Martha Stewart, the domestic diva who founded a billion-dollar homemaking empire.  Stock certificates shown in Martha Stewart Special were provided by Scripophily.com - The Gift of History.

    • February 10, 2005 CNBC Interview with Scripophily.com's CEO Bob Kerstein -

    • The Star-Ledger - Tuesday, February 01, 2005 - I just "came across" a stock certificate for 49 shares of Hughes Electronics in a pile of papers. Does it have any value? ... You're actually lucky in a way -- the company you have shares in still exists. More often than not, when Bob Kerstein's company gets a call from someone who found an old stock certificate, the company (many times) has gone bankrupt or disappeared.

      Kerstein, chief executive of the online site scripophily.com, said his firm fields about 25 inquiries a day on the topic. A related business, oldcompany.com, will research stock certificates for a fee, as will other similar companies.

      But even if the company that issued the stock has disappeared, the certificate itself may be worth something as a collectible. Kerstein's site buys and sells thousands of stock and bond certificates...
       

    • January 27, 2005 - Free Lance-Star Publishing Co. of Fredericksburg, Va - Vienna: Tysons Corner Marriott Hotel, 8028 Leesburg Pike, Fourth Annual Northern Virginia Stock Certificate and Bond Show and Auction. Event is devoted to the pursuit of old stocks and bonds, a collecting hobby known as scripophily. Jan. 28-29. Show admission is $3; the public may attend the auction free of charge. Call 703/250-2558 or visit tysonscorner.com.
       

    • January 26, 2005 CNBC Interview with Scripophily.com's CEO Bob Kerstein - Higher Resolution Video - Lower Resolution Video
       

    • Wall Street History comes alive in Tysons Corner! On January 28, and 29th, 2005,  the Professional Scripophily Traders Association - PSTA.com is sanctioning and attending the Fourth Annual Northern Virginia stock and bond show and auction. The event is devoted to the pursuit of old stocks and bonds, a collecting hobby formally known as Scripophily. It is very similar to that of coins and stamps. Today most people who invest in the stock market receive a computerized confirmation of their ownership of stock. Prior to the advent of computerized trading ornately illustrated stock  certificates were the standard proof of ownership in a company. Those certificates that have survived remain today as collectibles. While many people own stocks and bonds, many others are not aware of the history of the stock market. As such, Scripophily offers a fine opportunity to better understand and appreciate the history of finance over time.

      The live auction which will be held on Friday evening January 28, 2005 at the Tysons Corner Marriott Hotel. The catalog illustrates many examples of the certificates issued to companies to finance their growth and as such remain today as source documents demonstrating the history of free enterprise. A number of certificates of local interest will be found within the catalog’s pages as well as at the show on Saturday. A few examples are the Mount Vernon Memorial Association, George Gunther, Jr. Brewing Company of Baltimore, Emerson Drug Company of Baltimore, Washington Utilities Company and many more.

      There will be over fifty tables with offerings by some of the World’s largest dealers in old stocks and bonds including Scott J. Winslow Associates, Inc., Scripophily.com, George H. LaBarre Galleries, Inc., R. M. Smythe & Co. and many others. People who have old stocks and bonds buried away are invited to come speak with some of the world’s leading authorities to determine collectible value and possible saleability of their certificates. The public is invited to attend the auction free of charge while the show admittance fee is $3.00.

      You can find out more about the show and auction at the following website: www.tysonscorner.com.

       

    • Money Magazine February 2005 BY ELLEN McGIRT
      Is it Wahoo or Wahooey?
      Q. My son received 250 shares of Cleveland Indians stock as a gift a few years back. We framed it and hung It. The company was  sold and is now privately owned. Can he still redeem his stock? BILL WOERNER NORCROSS, GA.

      A. Good news—just in time too: The team's owner (which bought the Indians in February 2000) will redeem your shares for $22.6612 a pop if it receives the proper paperwork by Feb. 15, 2005 (or, by law, the value of the unclaimed shares reverts to the State of Ohio). Some 15,500 Indians shareholders have not redeemed an estimated 59,000 shares still outstanding. Most folks own just one or two shares and are probably keeping them as memorabilia. (At scripophily.com, where collectors trade old stock certificates, they're going for $125 to $200 each.) You, however, are looking at some serious green: $5,665. Call National City Bank in Cleveland at 800-622-7809 for a letter of transmit- tal and a return-envelope package. In- sert a picture of your newly wealthy son in that now-empty frame and have the whole family take a home-run trot.  
      Old stock certificates may pay off
       
    • January 19, 2005 - GEORGE CHAMBERLIN - For the North County Times - San Diego, California

      Q: In going through some of my late father's documents, I discovered some old stock certificates. I can't find any listing or evidence that the companies still exist. What should I do? ---- Carla, Bonsall

      A: It depends on how hard you want to work or how much you are willing to pay to have someone else do the detective work for you.....
      There are several resources available on the Internet that offer research services for a fee. They include ....Scripophily.com. For a fee ($40).. they will investigate the history of the questionable company....Even if you inherited shares that are worthless, there is a possibility that they may have some collector value. Many people consider stock certificates to be works of art, and they have become highly collectible. The hobby is called scripophily. The value of a certificate can be determined by a number of factors ---- history of the company, the quality of the artwork on the certificate, and even the signature of the officials on the document...

       

    • Motley Fool UK Thursday January 13, 2005 11:41 AM By David Kuo - There are thousands people who scour the globe for unusual shares. These are not share investors, as we understand it, but scripophilists, people who collect share and bond certificates. These bits of paper are not only viewed as beautiful works of art, but can be quite valuable too.

      For example, when Playboy first issued shares some thirty-four years ago, each certificate carried an image of an undressed woman. Thankfully, the nude model managed to find some clothes to wear in later issues! Apart from the rarity value of those early Playboy shares, bunny boss Hugh Hefner also signed each certificate personally. One of those rare original Playboy share certificates can fetch as much as $275 compared to a single share today that is only worth $12 a piece.

      According to experts, an autograph of a famous person on a share certificate can greatly enhance its value. Currently, the most precious certificates is a particular share in Standard Oil, which is valued at $136,000. This document was signed thrice by oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller - once as the owner of the share, a second time as a director of the company, and a third time when he endorsed it.

      .....According to site, scripophily.com, the move toward electronically traded shares could be a boon as new scrip becomes more limited. This implies that paper records will slowly disappear, so even the most ordinary and worthless certificates could eventually acquire value!
       

    • Yahoo Finance - Thursday December 9, 2004 - Scripophily.com Has Another Record Breaking Year - Historic Stock and Bond Certificates Continue to Gain Popularity - Old Company Certificates Are a Hit for Holiday Gifts -  WASHINGTON DC ----Scripophily.com, the Internet's largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, has achieved another record breaking year with a 17.5% increase in year to year sales with November 2004 being our best yet. Historic stock and bond certificates continue to gain in popularity as demonstrated by a 29% year to year increase in page views. Scripophily.com offers over 10,000 quality selections covering a wide range of companies and government securities printed from over 150 years ago to the present day......
       
    • Scripophily.com - The Gift of History is a leading provider of collectible stock and bond certificates and other old paper items from frauds, scandals, bankruptcies, dot coms, as well as the more traditional areas of railroads, telephone and telegraph, entertainment, sports, manufacturing, mining, utilities, oil and gas, retail, tobacco, foods, banks, insurance, health and others.

      We frequently loan items for display in the Smithsonian's Museum of Financial History in New York. The company also offers an old stock research service at OldCompany.com. Scripophily.com was founded by Bob Kerstein, President and CEO who has more than 25 years of senior management experience in the cellular, cable TV, satellite, internet, and professional sports and entertainment Industries as a Certified Public Accountant. Bob is also the President of the Professional Scripophily Trade Association.
       

    • Philadelphia Inquirer - Tue, Nov. 23, 2004 - Fool's School Old Stock Certificates Many of us occasionally end up with old stock certificates, unsure how to determine their value. Here are some additional resources suggested by the Securities and Exchange Commission: ...At www.scripophily.com, for a fee, you can have research done on whether your stock or bond certificate has any value. (Even if your company has gone belly up, the certificate may be worth something as a collectible. Scripophily may buy it from you....

       

    • The Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. - Old Stock Certificates may Still Have ValueOldCompany.com will charge $39.95 per report to tell you know what happened to the company and how to get in touch with them. There's no fee if they can't track down that information.Stocks that aren't worth anything as investments may still have value as collectibles, especially if they have attractive artwork, are signed by somebody famous or have historical significance. Kerstein is selling an 1861 American Express stock certificate signed by Henry Wells and William Fargo for $995. He also has an Insider Trading Package for $129.95, which includes a Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia and an ImClone Systems certificate signed by their infamous former CEOs. He'll also provide the wholesale and retail price of the certificate as a collectible when he researches the company.
       
    • WASHINGTON, DC (November 5, 2004) -  Scripophily.com achieves major milestone with 10,000 items Offers Largest Selection of Stock and Bond Certificates in World.   Scripophily.com ®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, has achieve a major milestone of having over 10,000 quality selections on our website.  Our selections cover the range from Bonds issued by the Confederate States of America to Stocks from Modern Scandals.  We have certificates signed by famous people including Henry Wells, William Fargo, Samual Prescott Bush ( Great Grandfather of President Bush ), Andrew Mellon,  John Delorean, J.P. Morgan, and many others.  We even have certificates from the original Minnesota Mining & Manufacturing Company signed by its founders. “ We are very satisfied with our selections and even more satisfied with our high customer satisfaction rating” said Scripophily.com founder and CEO, Bob Kerstein.  “These selections help our customers find that special one of a kind gift that only Scripophily.com can provide” Kerstein added

       

    • August 11, 2004 - JENNIFER SCOTT CIMPERMAN Associated Press - The Plain Dealer - Marketful of Memories The price of corporate memorabilia driven largely by retirees - Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - Jennifer Scott Cimperman Plain Dealer Reporter.... Collecting another kind of corporate stuff - rare and not- so-rare stock and bond certificates, known as scripophily - is a little less daunting thanks to books that provide ballpark figures. Even so, values are hardly precise.  Some certificates are prized for intricate artwork or specific printing techniques, for example. Other scripophily collectors seek famous signatures. And some simply want reminders of companies that employed their parents or grandparents.  "If it's a known commodity, that increases the value, but that isn't always the case," said Bob Kerstein, chief executive and founder of Scripophily.com. He said a dealer recently received $140,000 for a Standard Oil stock certificate signed by John D. Rockefeller. ....
       

    • August 4, 2004 - Washington Post  - Have You Picked Up the Dictionary Lately? -  Do you know what a tick is? How about a fallen angel? Are you a scripophily? If you grew up on a farm, you know what churning is, but what if you're an investor? If you pick up this month's Color of Money Book Club selection, you'll be able to answer all those questions and more about your money.  For August, I've chosen "Dictionary of Financial Terms" by Virginia B. Morris and her husband, Kenneth M. Morris (Lightbulb Press, $14.95).  This is a user-friendly dictionary with lots of colorful illustrations to make reading about finances a little less boring. .......So what's a tick?  It's not that nasty little bug. According to the "Dictionary of Financial Terms," a tick is the minimum movement by which the price of a security, option, or index changes. With stocks, a tick represents 1/16 of a point.

      Here are the answers to the rest of my questions: A fallen angel is the term for corporate or government bonds that were investment-grade when they were issued but have been downgraded by a rating service, such as Moody's Investors Service or Standard & Poor's. The term also is used to refer to stocks that are out of favor.

      And if you're a Scripophilist, don't worry. You don't have a fear of writing. Instead, you like collecting old stock and bond certificates. Scripophily is a combination of words from English and Greek, according to Bob Kerstein, chief executive of the Falls Church-based Web site, Scripophily.com. The word "scrip" represents an ownership right, and the word "philos" means to love. Check out this site. It's so cool. For $59.95 you can buy a Buckeye Steel stock certificate signed by President Bush's Great Grandfather Samuel Prescott.  If you're into newer stock certificates, Scripophily.com has some interesting and notorious stocks. For example, you can get an Enron stock certificate for $29.95.

       

    • Times Publishing - Collecting Network - What is Scripophily? SCRIPOPHILY (scrip-af-il-ly), the collecting of canceled old stocks and bonds, gained recognition as a hobby around the mid-1970s.  The word resulted combining words from English and Greek. The word "scrip"  represents an ownership right and the word "philos" means to love.   Today there are thousands of collectors worldwide in search of scarce, rare, and popular stocks and bonds. Collectors who come from the a variety of businesses enjoy this as a hobby, although there are many who consider Scripophily an good investment. In fact, over the past several years, this hobby has exploded.   Modern Dot companies and Scandals have been particularly popular.  You can find our more about modern collectible stock certificates at ModernStocks.com....
       

    • May 26, 2004 - North Devon Gazette and Advertiser - Internet trawl unearths a bit of history by Tony Gussin A LITTLE piece of North Devon’s railroad history has winged its way across the Atlantic from the windy city of Chicago....The beautifully engraved document was “discovered” by Alison Mills at the museum through a search of the internet. It was being offered for sale by Scripophily.com, an American company in Washington DC, which specialises in buying and selling historic or collectible share and bond certificates. “I emailed Bob Kerstein, Scripophily.com chief executive, to see if he would lend it to us for the exhibition – and he simply posted it to us,” said a delighted and amazed Alison....The certificate was bought by Scripophily.com from the UK and formed part of a large collection. Said Mr Kerstein: “Alison asked me if they could use it in the museum for a display – we work with museums all the time and are more than happy to help out. We are a great believer in preserving history and that is ultimately what museums want to do, so it was our pleasure to help.”  The certificate has been valued at $300...
       

    • Seattle Post-Intelligencer APRIL 5, 2004 Alas, we can have, but hardly ever hold By BILL VIRGIN SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER COLUMNIST ......Oh sure, we know what stock certificates look like, or are supposed to look like. Every now and then I get a catalog in the mail offering for sale elaborately and beautifully engraved stock certificates for long-gone railroad and steamship companies, often for prices far in excess of what the original shares sold for.

      Collecting such stock certificates as art or memorabilia is a big deal these days; Barron's recently did a piece on the pursuit ..... formally known as Scripophily. .......You can get stock certificates these days from the companies in which you invest -- if you ask for them. Most companies would rather you didn't and encourage investors to take a book entry or be registered in street name (through the brokerage) instead. Taking delivery of and holding stock certificates poses potential problems in the event of loss or theft, and if you sell those shares there's the hassle of delivering the shares to the brokerage that handled the transaction
       

    • Barrons MONDAY, APRIL 5, 2004  Paper Chase By RICHARD KARP GOT ANY STOCK CERTIFICATES in your attic? Better check if one of them is from The Wright Co., the pioneer of flight. If it is -- and if it's signed by Wilbur or Orville -- congratulations. You may have just won more than $100,000. Forget the modern stock market. Some folks are having far more fun collecting and trading stock certificates of companies from the past -- the glorious, the infamous and the wholly forgotten...An estimated 20,000 people worldwide now collect stock and bond certificates, up from just a few thousand five or 10 years ago, says Fairfax, Va., certificate dealer Bob Kerstein. "This is a tremendous growth period," he crows, adding that the field has surged with the real market over the past year.

      It's Wall Street's version of Antiques Road Show -- and it does indeed hit the road. In February, some 500 enthusiasts descended on Lancaster, Pa., for an annual get-together and auction hosted by the New York auction house R.M. Smythe & Co. Other auctions are held in such far-flung locales as Reno, Nev. (certificates of mining stocks), Bedford, N.H. (certificates with famous autographs) and Belgium (certificates with an international flavor).

      Collectors sometimes make history themselves. During the peak of the market mania in the 'Nineties, a United States Steel bond, dated 1901 and signed by Andrew Carnegie, sold for a head-turning $60,500. And an 1871 Standard Oil stock certificate, signed by John D. Rockefeller, fetched a record $132,000....Some dealers are pushing decidedly modern forms of the art. Kerstein, who operates a business called Scripophily.com, is offering a "Dot-com Package" of certificates from four Internet blowups: DrKoop.com, Broadband.com, PayForView.com, and WebVan.com. Total cost: $99.95. Or, for $129.95 you can buy the "Insider Trading Package." It's made up of two stock certificates -- one for Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, signed by the queen of domesticity herself before she was indicted, and one for Imclone, signed by her pal Sam Waksal before he went to jail. Then there's the "Modern Scandal Package," containing Enron, Qwest, Adelphia, MCI, WorldCom, Global Crossing, Kmart and HealthSouth. The eight go for $199.95.

      But most collectors still prefer antiques -- and they can choose from a nearly endless array of industries. Railroad paper is as popular as ever, along with telephone and telegraph issues. Want entertainment? You can bid on everything from opera-house bonds to circus stocks....

       
    • Sunday March 7, 2004 NBC DATELINE TV Show 7pm - 8pm EST -  Martha Stewart: Fall of an icon - Stock certificate shown in the telecast from Martha Stewart and ImClone were supplied by PSTA member Scripophily.com.  Dateline NBC Principal anchor Stone Phillips is joined by numerous NBC News correspondents twice a week to bring viewers compelling investigative reports and personal stories.
       
    • February 1, 2004 - Chicago Tribune Andrew Leckey is a Tribune Media Services columnist
      Q. I have several old stock certificates. How can I research them? Are there companies that do this?
      A. Most old stock certificates found in desk drawers or attics are worthless. Hundreds of mining companies failed early in the last century. Countless utilities, carmakers and department stores didn't survive the Depression. There are, however, some companies that merged, changed names or exited bankruptcy, with their old certificates retaining value. In addition, a few certificates have historical or artistic worth separate from their investment value, with potential for sale at shows or online auctions. Here are steps to determine the value of your certificates:...... There are private search companies that, for a fee, research certificate value. These include Scripophily.com (888-STOCKS6); Smythe & Co. (800-622-1880); ..... "We tell you what happened to the company, whether it was acquired, how to get in touch with who acquired it, or if it went out of business," explained Bob Kerstein, chief executive of Scripophily.com in Fairfax, Va., which charges $39.95 per certificate search. "If there's collectible value, you can send us a copy of it and we determine what we'd offer for it." Scripophily.com has one rare Edison Manufacturing Co. stock signed by Thomas Edison that is valued at $4,995.
       
    • February 5-8, 2004 - The Scripophily Show of Shows - The 17th Annual Strasburg Stock & Bond Scripophily Show and Auction  - The Strasburg Stock & Bond Show is the country's largest event for collectors of stocks & bonds. The 45-dealer bourse area will feature the trade's leading specialists from more than 30 states and Europe. Strasburg, PA - Scripophily.com will set up by the front door.
       
    • February 3, 2004, 10:56 AM PST By Matt Hines  Staff Writer, CNET News.com - Microsoft said Tuesday that it established an alliance with software maker Volante Technologies to build straight-through processing capabilities for the financial services market.....  The Securities Industry Association, the main trade group for the U.S. securities industry, has set a list of major goals the industry needs to achieve in the next few years to enable STP, including eliminating paper stock certificates and standardizing electronic payments.

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    • January 26, 2004 Rocky Mountain News -  SPRING CLEANING? Got an old stock certificate and wondering whether it has value? Call these companies or check out their Web sites for information: Stock Search Int'l  or  Scripophily.com, www.scripophily.com or toll-free at 1-888-786-2576. Research costs $40 to $85 per company.
       
    • WASHINGTON, DC (January 20, 2004) - Professional Scripophily Trade Association launched in January  ’04 is met with strong support - The Professional Scripophily Trade Association (“PSTA”) is an organization of Scripophily Dealers Committed to establishing a very high level of integrity in the development and promotion of collectible stock certificates and bonds. The PSTA commitment to offering first class customer service and professionalism.......
       
    • Thursday, January 15, 2004 - Old certificates may have value - Researching old companies takes legwork - By Helen Huntley - ST. PETERSBURG TIMES - Got an old stock certificate lying around the house or tucked away in a safe deposit box? These intriguing bits of paper often surface after a death when relatives sort through personal effects. The first question everyone asks is whether they are worth anything......A stock certificate might be worthless as an investment but worth something as a collectible. Value depends on the artwork, age, historical significance, rarity and popularity of the subject matter. For information about research services and collectibles, call ...Scripophily.com toll-free at 1 (888) 786-2576....
       
    • January 2004 - SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION - Final Rule: Processing Requirements for Cancelled Security Certificates  - While physical certificates may be quickly disappearing, they're still giving regulators and transfer agents plenty of angst. The Securities and Exchange Commission has just codified a decade-old practice within the stock transfer industry of how useless certificates should be canceled, and will for the first time allow transfer agents to destroy certificates within three business days of their cancellation......Maintaining Certificates as Collectors' Items - The Proposing Release requested comments on whether the Commission should mandate the destruction of cancelled certificates within thirty days of their cancellation. Three commenters, a finance professor, a non-public corporation, and the president of a securities certificate collectors' organization ( Robert A. Kerstein ) , argued against destroying old securities certificates because of their importance to financial history, their aesthetic merits, and their value to collectors in a field known as Scripophily.
       
    • January 9, 2004 Scripophily.com will be offering stock certificates from the  Northern Pacific Railroad and its branch lines. Chartered in 1864, The Northern Pacific Railroad completed a connection from the Great Lakes to the Pacific Coast. Encompassing over 100 different Railroads and connected companies, the holding offers an extremely important view of railroad finance in the developing Northwestern United States.  The number of well-known Wall Street figures who appear as shareholders signing certificates is remarkable. This is a virtual who’s who of American financial historical figures including John D. Rockefeller,  J. Pierpont Morgan,  Jay Gould, E. H. Harriman, important banker Jay Cooke, John S. Pillsbury; founder of Pillsbury Co, August Belmont of Belmont Stakes Fame, William Fargo; co-founder of Wells- Fargo, and Henry Ward Beecher; Anti-Slavery Reformer.
       

    • Two Major Scripophily Shows in 1st Quarter 2004
       

    • January 1, 2004 Professional Scripophily Trade Association PSTA.COM begins operationsThe PSTA is a premier professional association of dealers, launched on January 1, 2004, is organizied to help promote the hobby of Scripophily and Financial History.  Member dealers are  committed to customer service and education as well as providing the highest quality products, services and support possible

      December 2003 Bloomberg Markets ENRON SCRIP - Talk about paper profits.....Corporate scandals have been a boon for collectors of Wall Street paper....for $199.95 Scripophily.com will sell you a Modern Scandal Package of 8 Companies which include Enron, Global Crossing and World Com.

       

    • WASHINGTON, DC (November 6, 2003) Scripophily.com adds archive of Scarce Confederate War  Bonds to Website’s Historic Offerings - Confederate Bonds are an important part of U.S. Financial History - Scripophily.com now offers over 9,000 different items. Scripophily.com ®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, has recently acquired a large collection of authentic Bonds issued by the Confederate States of America which is shown at ConfederateBonds.com.  “With  the addition of this collection, we will now have over 100 different types of Confederate Bonds issued from 1861 to 1865 and ranging in price from $89.95 to $895.95” according to Scripophily.com’s founder and CEO, Bob Kerstein. The bonds include images of Stonewall Jackson, Jefferson Davis, George Washington, Old Confederate Sailors, CSA Cabinet Members and many others.  Although most of the bonds were issued from Richmond, Virginia there are some that were issued in Montgomery, Alabama prior to the confederacy moving their capital to Richmond. All of the bonds are hand signed, many of which by Robert Tyler  as CSA Registry of the Treasury, and the son of U.S. President John Tyler.....

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    • Thursday, October 23, 2003 - Montreal Gazette - It's time to peel those old stocks off the walls Collectors trading certificates. Actual shares of some worth more than trading value on stock exchanges....Stand aside income trusts. There are some more new ways for individuals to play the stock market....This relatively new hobby, called scripophily, caught the eye of more serious collectors starting in 1976, when a catalogue of pre-revolutionary Chinese and Russian bonds was published by a German firm. The highly decorative documents generated a strong international interest because of their appearance and their historical significance. That interest has only been heightened by a push on Wall St. to eliminate the issue of paper stock certificates in favour of exclusively electronic transactions - a move recently endorsed by the New York Stock Exchange. In several European countries, including France and Denmark, companies have already made that leap....

       
    • October 16, 2003 - CNN - Cashing in on collectibles - The Armchair Millionaire Guide
      By Lewis Schiff, Armchair Millionaire  NEW YORK (Armchair Millionaire) - Dear Armchair Millionaire: I just found a stock certificate from 1970 for one share of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. ...How can I find out how much it is worth today? ...If you're just dabbling with collectibles, the first place to turn for information will likely be the Internet. In the case of your old stock certificate, you want information on Scripophily -- the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates. You can visit www.scripophily.com to get an idea of the value of your stock certificate...
      PS: There's a great example of a Ringling Bros. stock certificate (1969) for sale for $295 at Scripophily.com. No clowning around!

       
    • Wednesday, October 08, 2003  Vintage stock certificate signed by Stuart Wolff now on sale By Marcie Geffner Inman News ... a vintage Homestore stock certificate signed by former Homestore CEO Stuart Wolff has surfaced on Scripophily.com at the sale price of $79.95. Scripophily sells stock certificates and other historic documents and autographs as collectibles. The certificates no longer represent any actual ownership rights in the various companies.... Scripophily also has sorted Homestore into its "dot-coms" category along with stock certificates of AskJeeves.com, eToys.com, Egghead.com, Monster.com (with famous logo!), Priceline.com, Salon.com, Tickets.com, WebVan.com and several dozen others. Of course the Hollywood-meets-politics crowd might prefer the 1999 "Planet Hollywood Stock Certificate (signed by) Demi Moore, Bruce Willis, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sylvester Stallone." Scripophily is selling that document for $199.95. Will the price be higher since the dealer correctly predicted the winner of yesterday's gubernatorial recall vote in California?


       

    • September 18, 2003 Coastal Fisherman Newspaper of Ocean City, Maryland - A brief respite in the bad weather ( Hurricane Isabel ) last weekend produced good catches of yellowfin tuna on Sunday, most on trolled ballyhoo in 40-50 fathoms inshore of Poor Man's Canyon. Skip Messinger, Tom Carroll, Rusty Messinger and Bob.com Kerstein CEO Scripophily.com, of Fairfax, VA, were among the anglers who had successful days offshore. They were fishing on the charter boat "Infinity" with Capt. Charlie Burns and Mate Matt Abraham out of Sunset Marina.

       
    • Scripophily 11, 2003 - Scripophily.com kicks off Stock and Bond Student Educational Program - Old Stock and Bond certificates are an excellent way to teach students about the stock market.  Our company is committed to help in this effort. Scripophily.com is sponsoring a program where we provide stock and bond certificates very inexpensively if they are being used in schools for educational purposes.  "There is no better way to teach kids and adults about the stock market than to let them feel and hold an actual stock and bond certificate" said Bob Kerstein, CEO Scripophily.com. "Explaining what a certificate has printed on it and what is represents is an important part of understanding the entire process"  added Kerstein.  
       
    • September 10, 2003 - Washington DC- Scripophily.com is now offering a Wall Street Scripophily Calendar with each month featuring a unique certificate in full color. This is a perfect gift for customers, clients, employees, friends, collectors, students and everyone else. The actual size of the calendar is 8 1/2" x 11" ( perfect size for mailing ) with 28 color print pages including the cover. You can order the calendar at StockCalendar.com for only $7.95 each.
       
    • September 9, 2003 - The rise and fraud of WorldCom In a new documentary, CNBC examines how Bernie Ebbers built WorldCom into a telecom giant that had competitors scrambling but ultimately recorded the nation's biggest accounting fraud.  Scripophily.com supplied the stock certificates used in this TV Special.  Scripophily.com is the internet's largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates and has a track record of supplying the media with images and use of its products for news, shows and specials.
       
    • September 2, 2003 - Scripophily.com launches a new and improved website which includes many new features and enhancements. The new website is an improvement in many areas including it powerful search engine with enhanced search functionality, industry and category organization,  improved vignette and certificate images, image zoom in capability,  Stock Certificates by Price Range, Inventory index by category, and many other features.  During the past 12 months we have received over 10,700,000 page views which represents a 25% increase over the prior year.  "We are very satisfied with our new website and are excited about the ever increasing popularity of the hobby of Scripophily" said Bob Kerstein, CEO Scripophily.com.

       

    • August 11, 2003 Barrons - Reviewed by Kathy Yakal - Joys in the Attic - Is that stock certificate worth more than the paper it's printed on?  ...The hobby of collecting old security certificates is called Scripophily.  Anyone interested in it might do well to visit a site allied with Old Company Research: Scripophily.com (www.scripophily.com), on which certificates can be bought and sold. 
       
    • August 08, 2003 Investing for Beginners Blog Archives with Joshua Kennon - Scripophily is the practice of collecting stock and bond certificates. One of my favorite sites on the topic is scripophily.net. Depending upon what they have available at the time, you can find actual Standard Oil stock certificates signed by John D. Rockefeller, industrial gold bonds, and more. I highly recommend them. My personal favorite is the "Monopoly Set"; for $39.95, you can get old certificates for the Reading Rail Road, Cleveland Short Line, B&O Railroad, and Pennsylvania Railroad.  TOKYO, July 31, 2003 (Reuters) - Japan to do away with stock certificates - Already they are rarely seen by Japanese investors, and from 2009 they will no longer exist. Following the lead of Britain and France, Japan is moving to do away with stock certificates.  In a move to cut costs and reduce the number of days required for the settlement of stock transactions, Japan's Financial Services Agency and Justice Ministry said on Thursday they planned to require all listed companies to allow investors to trade shares without certificates by 2009.  Under the new system, settlement periods will be cut to three days, and eventually to two, from the current four days, helping to smooth transactions, a Justice Ministry spokesman said....

       

    • July 11, 2003 (Bloomberg) -- A set of Chinese railway bonds sold in 1911 by J.P. Morgan & Co. fetched 947 pounds ($1,547) at Bonhams auction house in London this week, one of 93 lots purchased by collectors of antique debt and share certificates....Collecting aging bond and share certificates, often brittle and stained from years of handling, is known as Scripophily....The hobby dates back to the mid-1970s in the U.S., when dealers first compiled catalogues of Confederate bonds.... The society started in 1978 with about 30 people and now has 1,000 members in 42 countries.
       
    • July 10, 2003 Thomson Corporation and Securities Industry Switzerland’s SIS Finds New Meaning in Certificates - At a time when many of the world’s largest depository systems have either immobilized or dematerialized their securities holdings recording transfer of ownership in electronic form, one--in Switzerland--is bucking the trend in trying to preserve a part of history. SIS SegaIntersettle will be unveiling tomorrow in the town of Olten--about a half-hour’s drive from corporate headquarters in Zurich--a museum dedicated to antiquated securities certificates. The museum, the brainchild of SIS’ former director of marketing, Ronny Vogt, will hold more than 7,000 certificates from over 100 countries, on the floor of the three-story building owned by SIS.
       
    • Forbes Feature - June 25, 2003 -Corporate scandals too "painful" to catalogue By Tatiana Serafin NEW YORK (Reuters) - Models of office shredders, images of executives in handcuffs and detailed examples of corporate excess may seem like a sure-fire way for keepers of financial history to educate people about the most recent corporate scandals....Scripophily.com, which donated the certificates to the Financial History Museum.....Customers can purchase a piece of recent history on the site. The "modern scandal package" includes eight certificates from companies such as Enron and WorldCom.
       
    • June 17, 2003 More worthless WorldCom stock by Jeff Clabaugh Staff Reporter WorldCom stock certificates may be worth something to the Smithsonian. That's about it......
       
    • New York City, June 9, 2003 Museum of American Financial History - Scripophily.com loans Museum of American Financial History early Pan American Airlines and other certificates for the museum's “Pan Am and the Golden Age of Air Travel” display.  The exhibit focuses on Pan Am’s clipper period, from 1935 through 1946, when it became an airline of firsts including the first American airline to fly to foreign destinations, the first to institute round-the-world service, the first to employ flight stewards, the first to serve meals aboard, and the first to show full-length movies. Exhibit highlights include vintage route maps, advertisements, signage, postcards, brochures, a pilot’s jacket, and a collection of handwritten correspondence from a Pan Am advertising manager to his fiancée including his South American itinerary from 1941-1942. Financial documents, such as Pan Am stock certificates and annual reports, are also featured.
       
       
    • June 1, 2003 St. Petersburg TimesSpelling bee is a hotbed of learning and disgrace By JAN GLIDEWELL, Times Columnist  It has now been 47 years since my brush with spelling greatness, but the memories are sharp enough for me to appreciate and enjoy accounts of the 76th annual Scripps Howard National Spelling Bee.....(Scripophily) appears frequently on the Internet and apparently refers to the hobby of collecting old stock, share and bond certificates.
       
    • May 29, 2003 Houston Chronicle Washington Bureau You have his word on it Ousted in national bee's second round, Pearland boy vows to try again next year.... A 12-year-old from Roanoke, Va., was right on "videlicet," and a 13-year-old from Seattle scored on "scripophily."
    • May 29, 2003 - Seatle PI - Spelling bee's tough -- definitely In the national contest, a local 13-year-old spelled words beyond the ability of most people.....Natasha Smith spelled words such as these correctly:...scripophily (the hobby of collecting old stock and bond certificates)...
    • May 2, 2003, Sacramento Bee by Jack Sirard: ... Q: I am having trouble tracking down information on an old oil company and have had no luck using the Internet to find information on the company. A. If you don't find anything, you can turn to one of the many companies that do stock searches for a fee. These companies often highlight the successes they have had in finding "old worthless stocks" that turned out to be worth thousands of dollars.  But I think for the most part these "worthless" stocks are indeed worthless. Sometimes they have value to collectors. Here are a couple of places to check: Scripophily.com, which opened its virtual doors in 1996, bills itself as a leading provider of collectible stock and bond certificates and other old paper items. It also provides research information on old stocks and companies ( OldCompany.com ), The toll-free number is (888) 786-2576.....

       

    •  March 17, 2003 Atlanta Business Chronicle Some firms eliminate paper stock certificates by Anya Martin Contributing Writer As technology has advanced over the past decade, paper stock certificates have been steadily going the way of the dinosaur, currently accounting for less than 10 percent of the trading market. Now, there's a move to completely eliminate paper stock certificates....A 2002-dated Coca-Cola stock certificate offered by Scripophily.com, a Chantilly, Va.-based firm that sells stock certificates to a bustling collectors' market, boasts ornate embossed decorative borders and the art nouveau image of a woman reclining in front of Aladdin's lamp.  Scripophily is defined as "the collecting of canceled old stocks and bonds, [which] gained recognition as a hobby around the mid-1970s..."

       
    • March 15, 2003 - The Globe and Mail By RICHARD BLOOM - If you can't trade it, might as well frame it -- You may not want to hold Enron Corp. shares in your portfolio, but how about having them hang on your wall?  ...Bob Kerstein, founder and chief executive officer with Scripophily.com LLC, says his site has an inventory of more than 8,000 collectibles -- ranging from pennies a share all the way up to the hand-signed DeLorean share for $8,995 (U.S.),   ..."Sales are good. We get over a million page hits a month on our Web site. We get a lot of activity, a lot of interest," said Mr. Kerstein, who started collecting classic securities in 1990...
       
    • January 27, 2003 Scripophily News - Hobby of Scripophily Celebrates 25 Year Anniversary-
      Scripophily 1978 - 2003 - Scripophily.com celebrates with Huge Sale
      - ...The hobby's name was conceived in 1978. The word resulted combining words from English and Greek. The word "scrip"  represents an ownership right and the word "philos" means to love..."We are happy to be part of this wonderful hobby that has thousands of collectors worldwide" said Bob Kerstein, CEO Scripophily.com.  "The hobby has many great people involved in it with whom I am proud to be affiliated" Kerstein added.

       

    • KOGO Radio in San Diego - Sunday, January 26, 2003 - "Money in the Morning" with George Chamberlin - Bob Kerstein, CEO of Scripophily.com will join the radio talk show prior to the Super Bowl in San Diego to discuss the hobby of Scripophily.  KOGO is San Diego's EXCLUSIVE NewsTalk Radio Station.


       

    • ABC News - 1/15/2003 - Wall Street lobbies to ditch paper stock certificates - The Securities Industry Association is launching a publicity blitz this year to persuade publicly traded companies and their shareholders that a paperless world will save money and time. Its effort is aided by a New York Stock Exchange rule adopted this summer that allows listed companies to eschew paper certificates...."Certificates do so much in capturing the history of the company," said Kerstein...

       

    • January 15, 2003 WASHINGTON (Dow Jones) NEWSWIRES by Lynn Cowan --Wall Street's main trade group is campaigning to do away with paper stock certificates and instead keep track of all investor holdings electronically....As for scripophilists - collectors of stock certificates - the end of paper certificates would probably increase the market value of those in circulation today by capping the supply, said Bob Kerstein, chief executive of Scripophily.com, a Chantilly, Va., company devoted to buying and selling certificates. But if many companies go electronic, collectors would miss out on the chance to buy new certificates that could later prove interesting or valuable.
       

    • January 9, 2003 -- CNBC's Wall Street correspondent David Faber has created a one-hour documentary - "The Big Heist - How AOL Stole Time Warner" - which details how the deal came together, how it unraveled and what the future might hold for the partnership.  Stock certificates provided by Scripophily.com were used in this documentary.
       

    • January 6, 2003 - New York Times - Museum Explores Capitalism's Feats and Follies By RALPH BLUMENTHAL .....What would John D. Rockefeller say? In the basement of his Standard Oil Building, just steps from Wall Street, where the Museum of American Financial History celebrates the wonders of capitalism, an exhibit wall is papered with gaily colored stock certificates carrying names like Enron, WorldCom and ImClone Systems.... The latest exhibition of one-share stock certificates, worth virtually nothing except to collectors, were donated by Scripophily.com, the Internet's largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates. The hobby of collecting such nonredeemable paper is called Scripophily (pronounced skrih-POFF-a-lee).

       
    • January 3 2003 - Financial Times  - Scrip holds value long after closure by Peter Temple - When companies fail, are nationalised or are taken over, little remains to mark their passing except what one observer once called "the art of finance" - their stock and bond certificates......Others pick up certificates dating from spectacular corporate failures, like the South Seas Company or Penn Central. Enron and Worldcom certificates are currently a hot item. You can, for example, buy them ready-framed from the website www.scripophily.com . One boon is that the supply of new scrip is getting more limited. Dematerialised settlement means that paper certificates are gradually becoming a thing of the past, so even the most mundane will eventually acquire value.


       

    • December 31, 2002 - CNBC New Years Eve Show - Bob Kerstein, CEO of Scripophily.com joins Michelle Caruso-Cabrera of CNBC to discuss Scripophily.com's collectible Stock and Bond Certificates.

       
    • WASHINGTON, DC (October 28, 2002) - Scripophily.com Donates Stock Certificates from Modern Scandals and Dot Coms to Smithsonian's Museum of American Financial History
      Scripophily .com ®, the Internet’s largest buyer and seller of collectible stock and bond certificates, has donated a collection of modern stock certificates from frauds, scandals, and dot com-related busts to the Museum of American Financial History, an Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution located in New York City.  The certificates have been added to the Museum’s permanent collection and some, including the Enron certificate, have been incorporated into a display on market regulation and corporate responsibility in the Museum’s gallery at 28 Broadway in Lower Manhattan. “Until a year ago, our most popular permanent exhibit had been on the Crash of 1929.  Now, people are more interested in the recent bankruptcies and scandals because they have affected their own finances,” said Meg Ventrudo, the Museum’s Assistant Director for Exhibits and Education.  “We are grateful to Scripophily.com for their generous donation.”...

       
    • Wednesday, October 9, 2002 - Scripophily.com will be a Co-Sponsor in the Orlando Extravaganza OPEX 2003 Postcard and Scripophily Show in Orlando, Florida January 4th and 5th, 2003. The show is the Biggest and Best Old Paper Show in the South Eastern U.S. - HUNDREDS OF DEALER TABLES OF POST CARDS AND ALL TYPES OF PAPER ITEMS INCLUDING OLD AND MODERN STOCK AND BOND CERTIFICATES PRESENTED FOR SALE BY DEALERS FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD!

       
    • Monday, October 7, 2002 Palm Beach Post Tyco stock certificate going for $59.95  By Jeff Ostrowski, Staff Writer  With shares of Tyco International Ltd. trading around $13, who'd pay $59.95 for a Tyco stock certificate? Perhaps a "scripophilist" -- someone who collects stocks, paper money, letters and other documents of historical import. Scripophily.com of Chantilly, Va., last week offered a Tyco certificate bearing the signature of former Chairman and CEO Dennis Kozlowski, a Boca Raton resident, for $59.95. Scandals boost a company's stock certificates, said Scripophily head Bob Kerstein. But given the rash of corporate malfeasance in the past six months, Tyco certificates haven't sold as quickly as Enron Corp. shares did this year.  The priciest certificate sold by Scripophily was a Standard Oil share signed by John D. Rockefeller and Henry M. Flagler. It fetched $8,500 -- and proved that, even for scripophilists, corporate crime doesn't always pay.

       

    • September 27, 2002 Chicago Sun Times Lifestyles of the rich and obscure BY CHRIS WHITEHEAD BUSINESS COPY EDITOR The economy may be stuttering, but a guy in Texas still came up with $44,000 for a big E that Enron used to have outside one of its Houston offices. And in Australia, a grocer paid a record $20,000 for the first tray of this season's mangoes--a fruit that usually sells for about $40 a tray. Both men were bidding at auctions--in Texas at Enron's garage sale and in Australia at a fund-raiser for a children's hospital. .....Paper profits Martha's troubles are probably good news for Scripophily.com, too. The seller and researcher of old stocks and bonds will sell you a pair of stock certificates--ImClone and Martha Stewart Living--for $89.95. More interested in Enron? They'll sell you that, too, and for less than 44 grand.

       

    • September 21, 2002 WASHINGTON DC.- SCRIPOPHILY.COM WILL ATTEND Washington Historical Autographic and Certificate Organization Show On November 9th  2002 in Tysons Corner, Virginia - The Washington Historical Autographic and Certificate Organization is bringing together, on November 9th 2002, collectors and dealers of Scripophily from across the country.   Scripophily.com will have a large display of Modern Stocks which is one have the fastest growing areas of the hobby.  Included in this area are certificates from the current Scandals including such companies as Enron, Worldcom, Adelphia, ImClone, Martha Stewart, Rite Aid, Tyco International, DrKoop, Egghead, and XO Communications.  You will be able to see our exclusive "Insider Trading" and "Modern Scandal" Packages.  We will also be premiering our "Disconnected Number" package of failed telecommunication companies. This exciting show and auction will be held at the Westpark Hotel in Tyson Corner from 9 am to 5 pm.

       
    • Thursday, September 12, 2002; Page E05 Washington Post - For Some E-Commerce Sites, Modesty Is the Best Policy By Ellen McCarthy -Falls Church-based Scripophily.com, for example, which sells stock certificates and other corporate memorabilia, is humming along nicely, said founder and chief executive Bob Kerstein.  Kerstein never intended to create a mega-corporation with thousands of employees. In 1996, after holding jobs with several public companies, he envisioned a start-up that could provide him a modest but steady living. By doing much of the grunt work himself and keeping costs minimal, Kerstein has kept the private business profitable and able to support its four-person staff, he said.  "The biggest key to the success is that we are doing it ourselves, not outsourcing the marketing, Web development and advertising," he said. "Had we outsourced it, we would have been bankrupt 10 times over."

       
    • THE WALL STREET JOURNAL  Wednesday, September 11, 2002 By AARON ELSTEIN Investors Find Certificates Are Still Worth Something .....Indeed, stock certificates may get scarce soon. The New York Stock Exchange said on July 30 that member companies no longer need to issue certificates, ending a decades-old rule. The Nasdaq has never had a rule requiring members to issue certificates, a spokesman said......Bob Kerstein, chief executive of Scripophily.com LLC in Chantilly, Va., says that a certificate issued by Merrill Lynch in the 1970s is becoming of interest to collectors. The reason: The certificate contains a depiction of the World Trade Center.

       
    • Yahoo News September 4, 2002 - Scripophily.com Receives SEC Position Letter


       
    • Kiplinger - COLLECTIBLESCoins & Stock Certificates -  If the company is long gone, a stock-certificate collector (called a scripophilist) may still be interested in it as a collectible....visit Scripophily.com and the Washington Historical Autograph and Certificate Organization.


       
    • September 3, 2002 SCRIPOPHILY.COM RECEIVES SEC CLARIFICATION LETTER
      ENABLES SALE OF UNCANCELLED STOCK CERTIFICATES AS COLLECTIBLES
      FROM PUBLICLY TRADED COMPANIES
      .
      Scripophily.com ®, the Internet’s largest and most recognized brand in the collectible stock and bond market has received a no-action letter from the Staff of the Division of Market Regulation of the Securities and Exchange Commission that will enable Scripophily.com to sell single share certificates.....“We are also very grateful for the cooperation and assistance of the SEC in helping collectors preserve the history of our times by addressing this issue”, added Kerstein....

       
    • 8/27/2002 The Buffalo News   Adelphia stock worth big bucks to collectors By FRED O. WILLIAMS News Business Reporter  Adelphia stock only fetches 14 cents on the over-the-counter market, but there's still a place where it's worth $80 a share.  Actually the price is $79.95, and the place is Scripophily.com, a company in Falls Church, Va., that makes a market in the stock certificates of infamous companies.

       
    • 24.08.2002 New Zealand Herald - Corporate scandals leave scent of cash


    • Voice of America News - 20 Aug 2002 - Collectors Buying Stock Certificates of Beleaguered Corporate Giants - As investors watch their stock portfolios plunge in the wake of corporate mischief sweeping Wall Street, collectors are snapping up stock certificates from the beleaguered corporate giants...  A website called Scripophily.com buys and sells old stock certificates. The innovation that sets the company apart from its competition....

       
    • Reuters - August 20, 2002 - By Christopher Doering - WASHINGTON, Aug 20 (Reuters) US corporate scandals create new collectors' market - As investors have watched their portfolios plunge in the wake of corporate mischief sweeping Wall Street, collectors have snapped up anything associated with beleaguered companies ....Stock certificates have garnered the most attention as they offer the best long-term "investment" for collectors. ...Kerstein's Scripophily .com is selling its "Insider Trading" package of certificates from ImClone Systems Inc IMCL.O . and Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia MSO.N for $90.

       
    • Monday, August 12, 2002; Page E01  Washington Post Collecting Something Other Than Dividends By Jerry Knight Enron Corp., Adelphia Communications Corp., Kmart Corp., Qwest Communications International Inc., Peregrine Systems Inc., Dynegy Inc., WorldCom Inc. and its MCI tracking stock....Kerstein's customers are not investors. They are collectors, business history buffs, scandal fans and cynical survivors of one of the darkest chapters in the history of capitalism. And they all want stock certificates....

       

    • Yahoo Finance - Monday July 29, 2002 - Stock Certificates Capture Business Trends and Historic Events - Scripophily.com, the Internet's largest and most recognized brand in the collectible stock and bond market...

       
    • WASHINGTON, DC July 29, 2002 - Business Wire - Stock Certificates from Scandals, Insider Trading and Bankruptcies are Worth Collecting - According to Bob Kerstein, CEO and Founder of Scripophily.com “Modern day certificates from frauds and scandals are highly desirable because people have lived through the era from irrational exuberance to infectious greed.   There is a connection of the best of times and the worst of times that will live in all of us for many years to come.”  PDF file

       

    • Dateline ABC SUNDAY, JULY 28, 7:00 P.M. ET - Take the Money and Run NBC Anchor Tom Brokaw reports for a one-hour Dateline special, “Take the Money and Run - Major Scandal Stock certificates for the special supplied by Scripophily.com.
       
    • 26/07/2002 Réseaux & Télécoms Violente remontée des actions Worldcom et Enron Marc OLANIE - Qwest, Worldcom, Kmart, MCI, Enron, rien que du beau linge –devrait-on dire linceul- réuni dans un « Modern Scandal Package » vendu pour la modique somme de 300 $ (offre promotionnelle, prix public 530 dollars).
       
    • July 26, 2002 Wall Street Journal - Collecting Corporate Scandals By BROOKS BARNES -  Corporate fiascoes are roiling Wall Street -- but they're heating up the collectibles market...but don't buy thinking that the stuff will go up in value.. .One exception: Stock certificates of famous defunct companies, which have a much longer history as collectibles.  Worldcom Stock Certificate compliments of Scripophily.com
       
    • July 10, 2002 - Darwin Magazine -  Stock Report By Daintry Duffy - Remember how your friends laughed when you told them of your plans to get rich on Whoodoo.com stock?...According to Bob Kerstein, founder and CEO of Scripophily.com, among the biggest sellers on his site are...

       
    • July 9, 2002  - Jay Leno Show  "Let me ask you: Anybody got a Martha Stewart stock certificate? I'll trade you two WorldComs and an Enron for it, if you have one!"
       
    • July 9, 2002 - David Letterman Show "By the way, before I came out here, I received a phone call from Martha Stewart and she asked me if I would make an announcement for Martha. And she just wants all of her stockholders to know that those stock certificates can be made into lovely place mats."
       
    • July 2002 - Scripophily.com makes History Channel's Prestigious "Shop History Site" List


      July 2002 - Scripophily Magazine - BullstoBears.com DOT COM MANIA and Article - Bob Kerstein, CEO Scripophily .com

       
    • Star Ledger June 26, 2002 - How to Make Money on WorldCom by Andy Obermueller - While the rest of the planet was going nuts watching WorldCom, Bob Kerstein was cool as a cucumber. He's selling his shares for a hundred bucks a pop. Say what? Kerstein deals in stock certificates as collectibles, and he's getting $100 apiece for WolrdCom shares.... which bear the printed signatures of ousted CEO Bernie Ebbers and deposed CFO Scott Sullivan....

       
    • June 12, 2002 Norway Bilverden:Packard skal gjenopplives - Hjælp!  Eller hvis du går til en annen site jeg har stor glede av, http://shop.store.yahoo.com/scripophily og derfra banker deg inn på biler, vil du blant annet se at et nydelig, gammelt aksjebrev fra Packard vil koste deg under 40 dollars.
       

    • THE MOTLEY FOOL  Date: 06-10-2002; The Dallas Morning News; Finding old stock certificates' value...www.Scripophily.com...

    • June 9, 2002  The Hartford Courant We frequently hear from readers who find old stock certificates and don't know how to determine their value. It's a confusing matter, because many companies merge with and split from other companies, changing their names along the way...At www.scripophily.com, for a fee, you can have some research done on whether your stock or bond certificate has any value. (Even if your company has gone belly-up, the certificate may have value as a collectible. Scripophily may buy it from you...
       

    • May 2002 - Esquire Magazine - What to do with your Stock Certificates by Brian Frazer.  ( The certificates shown in this article came from Scripophily.com )
       

    • May 2, 2002 -  X PRIZE and Scripophily.com offer Commemorative Certificate Erik Lindbergh’Depart Solo Flight Across The Atlantic Grandson follows 1927 flight plan to commemorate its 75th Anniversary and to promote the X PRIZE and space tourism
       

    • May 1, 2002 - Antique Trader - Investing interest - Stocks and Bonds track the history of financial heartache.... Surprisingly, many of the new stocks are more valuable than the earlier pieces...
       

    • Monday, 8 April, 2002 BBC News - Worth the paper it's written on?...The art of share certificate collecting is called scripophily and it's quite a little hobby.

       

    • Friday, March 29, 2002 - The Sacramento Bee - Jack Sirard - From the amount of mail I've been getting on this subject of late, it looks as though more and more people are treasure hunting in their attics.....Scripophily.com (www.scripophily.com) wheels and deals in historic stock certificates. Scripophily is the formal name for collecting antiquated stock certificates. Scripophily.com has been in business since 1996 and bills itself as a leading provider of collectible stock and bond certificates and other old paper items. It also provides research information on old stocks and companies. The toll-free number is (888) 786-2576.

       

    • March 4, 2002  Physician’s Weekly -  Koop Stock Selling Better as Novelty Than Dot-Com Business - CHANTILLY, VA. --  If you think stock in the now-defunct medical website drkoop.com isn’t worth the paper it’s printed on, think again. Scripophily.net, a website here that touts stocks and bonds from expired companies as “the gift of history,” is selling drkoop.com stock certificates...

       
    • 07-Mar-2002 FEATURED PROGRAMMING E*TRADE Financial Daily Pack rats unite: Collecting old stock certificates (8:03)  host Jonathan Hoenig and WebFN News Anchor Tom Hudson talk about this unusual hobby with Bob Kerstein, CEO of Scripophily.com.

    • February 28, 2002 - CBS Evening News - Dan Rather reports "...Enron's actual stock is selling for less than the paper its printed on at $100..." with a certificate image provided by Scripophily.com and held by Bob Kerstein, CEO.

    • February 27, 2002 Strasburg, Pennsylvania Scripophily.com is going on a Stock and Bond Roadshow

    • January 22, 2002 Pennsylvania State University Enron Disaster Will Provide Lessons For Years To Come Deseret News Publishing Co by Ron Scherer and David R. Francis

    • January 16, 2002 - The Christian Science Monitor Lessons of Enron: How could no one have seen it? ...The degree to which Enron has fallen is summed up by the fact that its stock may now be worth more as a souvenir than as a certificate of ownership. Bob Kerstein, an accountant and financial historian, is offering Enron stock certificates on his collector web site, Scripophily.com, at $100 a pop. Or he was - right now he's sold out.


    • January 11, 2002 - Houston Business Journal - Enron Corp.'s stock price has been reeling in the range of 66 cents to start the new year, but there's still one place where a share of the fallen energy giant commands .... A "beautifully engraved certificate" of Enron stock last week was priced at $99.95 on Scripophily.com, the Old Stock Superstore. "We are currently sold out," notes Scripophily.com. "But we expect to receive some more."

    • January 3, 2002 KLIF Dallas Radio Station Ankarlo Mornings  Darrell's first week at KLIF Enron Stocks are Collectors' Item guest: Bob Kerstein - president of Scripophily.com - Note: We are about 32 minutes in the show.

       

    • January 4, 2002 - CBS.MarketWatch.com correspondent Steve Orr talks with founder Bob Kerstein of the Old Stock Superstore Scripophily.com, who says collectors buy certificates for companies like Enron to remind them of how bad and good...things can be.
    •  
       

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